ASU grad attributes success to scholarship funding

Alexander Almeida is a spring 2022 Dean’s Medalist


May 3, 2022

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

Alexander Almeida will graduate summa cum laude this spring from Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University with degrees in economics and mathematics. As an outstanding member of the Sun Devil community, he has had many opportunities to learn, grow and serve those in need. Portrait of ASU grad Alexander Almeida. Photo courtesy Alexander Almeida Download Full Image

During his time at ASU, he studied abroad in India and Argentina, and interned at the Federal Reserve doing economic research. He helped direct an environmentally focused portfolio of over $1 million for ASU Enterprise Partners and worked with the Gammage Scholars to help families in the Phoenix Valley succeed.

For these reasons and others, Almeida was selected as the spring 2022 Dean’s Medalist for the Department of Economics at The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

But Almeida doesn’t take his Sun Devil experience for granted. He credits support from donors in helping fund his educational journey. 

“The reason that I was able to pursue my degree was the incredible generosity of the sponsors of the Business School Scholarship, Earl and Ellen Davis Scholarship, Gammage Scholarship, IGNITE Fellowship, National Hispanic Scholarship, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership's Founders' Scholarship, Spanish Summer Program Scholarship, as well as the Jonathan and Helen Wexler Family, along with the support of my friends and family,” he said.

Now, Almeida is prepared to utilize his skills to solve societal problems. He plans to do economic research for the next two years as a research fellow at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business, where he hopes to earn a graduate degree in economics to continue studying the role that financial markets play in human and environmental betterment.

Learn more about Almeida’s Sun Devil story.

Question: What was your “aha” moment when you realized you wanted to study the field you majored in?

A: After my first year at ASU, I underwent an unexpected surgery to remove a bone cyst from my spine as I was taking summer classes. On the day of the surgery, I even turned in a problem set for my linear algebra class. 

I was simultaneously confronted with my mortality and choices about my major, my career and the legacy that I wanted to leave. I decided to study mathematics and economics to try to make the world a better place. 

Q: Did you encounter any challenges? If so, how have you overcome them?

A: I came to ASU from Illinois knowing only a few people, so adapting to the environment here was a fun challenge. Through dorming at Barrett, clubs and classes, I have made many lifelong friends and relationships. I also convinced my sister, now a sophomore, to join me at ASU.

Q: Which professor taught you the most important lesson while at ASU?

A: It is really challenging to narrow down the breadth of guidance that I have received into a singular moment. I do want to recognize that my interests in research have been nurtured by gifted academics Drs. Ross Emmett, Chad Stecher, Michael Hanemann and Christos Makridis. 

In economics, I am indebted to Drs. Edward Schlee, Edward Prescott, Bart Hobijn and Rajnish Mehra for their mentorship in pursuing a career in the field, and from the mathematics faculty, I have received valuable guidance from Dr. Donald Jones. 

The leadership at the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership as well the administrators at Barrett have also contributed to my success. 

Q: What's something that you've learned during your time at ASU – in the classroom or otherwise – that surprised you or changed your perspective?

A: I traveled to India to study abroad with the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. My cohort worked with a group of rural night schools affiliated with the Barefoot College in Tilonia, Rajasthan. I had the chance to talk with some of the students at a night school, and when I asked the students about their aspirations, they responded that all they wanted was to attend school all day. It changed my perspective on education and empowered me to fight for students here in Maricopa County that face systemic barriers to their success. 

I had the privilege of teaching children who had sought asylum from countries across the world with RISE Tutoring, and when the pandemic compounded barriers for disadvantaged students in Phoenix, I helped to organize with the Gammage Scholars, a community-based campaign to empower families in getting digitally connected.

Lauren Whitby

Digital Marketing Manager, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

480-965-3787

SCETL, economics double major aims high

Jonah McCoy is going on to pursue PhD from University of Houston, credits academic rigor for his achievements


April 28, 2022

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

Jonah McCoy is not shy about his academic achievements and career goals. Jonah McCoy ASU graduate Jonah McCoy is a double major in civic and economic thought and leadership and in economics. He aims at winning prestigious Leo Strauss Award. Download Full Image

I seek to become a peer with my mentors,” he said.

The Arizona State University graduate — an early adopter of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership (SCETL) program — is confident about his future. In the fall of 2022, Jonah will start his PhD in political philosophy at the University of Houston, a well-deserved recognition of his academic skills.

“Jonah's talent and commitment to the life of the mind were immediately apparent to all of us in those early days of SCETL, when Jonah was one of our first majors,” said Assistant Professor Karen Taliaferro, adding, “I have come to see how exceptional he is not only in his intelligence but in his determination and perseverance. Beyond this, he is a fundamentally kindhearted person.”

Born in Fresno, California, Jonah moved with his family to Nogales, Arizona, when he was in second grade. He says he knew at an early age that he would follow an academic career, and in 2017 he joined ASU’s Barrett, The Honors College as an economics major, but his path took a slight turn in the fall of that year.

Question: How did you learn about SCETL?

Answer: I walked by a flyer on campus promoting the Civic Discourse Project lecture series on “Free Speech and Intellectual Diversity,” and I started attending the events. Then in the following summer, I enrolled in SCETL’s Summer Leadership Seminar “Shakespeare's Leadership Lessons” in Sedona, and it was delightful. That week, I met phenomenal people, including Cameron Vega and Robert Bartlemay, among others. That experience pushed me to enroll in CEL 100 with Professor Karen Taliaferro, who became a prominent figure in my life. Then came a course on religion with Professor Paul Carrese, and when I realized I was getting a major in civic and economic thought and leadership. One realizes one is in the right place. Things happen for a reason.

Jonah McCoy reads aloud from "Henry V." during the summer of 2018 course in Sedona

Jonah McCoy reads aloud from Shakespeare's "Henry V" during the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership's summer 2018 course in Sedona, Arizona.

Q: Which course was your favorite?

A: I can’t say there was a SCETL course that wasn’t phenomenal.

Q: What makes SCETL so special?

A: It’s a community of like-minded individuals. We are all interested in these important topics in a department that encourages free and open debate. We are free to disagree and discuss everything. At SCETL, I have never met slouchers. Every student at the school is a mover and shaker. Everyone goes on to do big things, to become student body presidents, top-level students participating in big projects that matter, and so on. Ultimately, it’s the quality of students. SCETL doesn’t attract mediocrity. They are all bright, genuinely phenomenal individuals, and do amazing things. SCETL people think big and have big dreams. It comes from the faculty. They are all intentionally here to provide an education, not just a degree.

Q: How did your peers push you forward?

A: At SCETL, one can’t be intellectually complacent because one is surrounded by great thinkers. The debates we engage with at the school challenge you, and you will be called out if you say nonsensical claims. This community of thinkers encourages you to substantiate yourself.

Q: Did you ever think you would pursue a career in classical education?

A: My understanding at the time was that classical education was in full retreat across the country when I came in. And today I am who I am, and I am going where I am going because of SCETL’s faculty. I will receive a doctorate degree fully funded from the University of Houston, and I am grateful to Professor Michael Zuckert, who identified in me the potential to do it. He found a place that is amicable to me and went out of his way to help find a good fit for me.

Q: What is your goal?

A: I want to teach at a place like SCETL. It’s the only thing I see myself doing: teaching at a place like this, surrounding myself with pupils and seeking truth through dialogue and inquiry.

Q: What would you say to an incoming SCETL student?

A: Embrace this small, phenomenal community. Go to the events, become the spirit of it. Making connections with your peers is one of the most important parts of this education. It’s a fantastic cohort.

Q: What is your favorite part about SCETL?

A: The faculty. If SCETL didn’t believe in the education it offers, it could not be what it is, and students would not go as far as they go.

Q: What is the biggest takeaway from your experience as a SCETL major?

A: The absolute beauty of political philosophy, which led me to become a Tocqueville scholar.

Q: What is your bedside-table favorite Tocqueville book?

A:The Ancient Regime.” It’s his most important book, in my opinion.

Q: What comes after your doctorate degree?

A: That’s easy. The Leo Strauss Award from the American Political Philosophy Association for my dissertation. I am interested in breaking trends and going off to do something new with bold ideas.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

 
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The College recognizes academic excellence with spring 2022 Dean's Medalists

April 26, 2022

On May 11, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University will recognize its highest-achieving students from the social sciences, natural sciences and humanities at the spring 2022 convocation.

Each semester, departments and schools within The College select outstanding students who have demonstrated a steadfast commitment to academic excellence during their time at ASU. These students will be awarded a prestigious Dean’s Medal in honor of their scholastic achievements.

Meet the outstanding Dean’s Medalist awardees from The College for spring 2022.

MORE: Read about some of ASU's other spring graduates.

Gregory Abbott

Portrait of ASU student Gregory Abbot.

Dean’s Medal: School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership
Major: Civic and economic thought and leadership
Minor: History

Abbott is a Barrett, The Honors College student with a passion for history and education.

During his time at ASU, Abbott played a pivotal role in founding the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership Student Assembly. He has been engaged in numerous research projects, working with faculty and students on the Arizona Constitution Project as well as topics including religion, conflict and immigration.

After graduation, Abbott will participate in a fellowship program at the University of Notre Dame that involves coursework and experience in the high school classroom. He aspires to teach high school social studies.

Ariana Afshari

Portrait of ASU student Ariana Afshari.

Dean’s Medal: School of Life Sciences
Major: Biological sciences (neurobiology, physiology and behavior)
Minor: Civic and economic thought and leadership

During her time at ASU, Afshari was deeply involved in scientific research, spending time studying developmental neurobiology, mathematical neuro-oncology and neurosurgery. Her contributions to these projects resulted in the co-authorship of at least four scientific manuscripts.

Afshari served as the director of health and wellness for the undergraduate student government, where she successfully implemented a program that offers free menstrual products on campus. In this capacity, she also illustrated and published an interactive COVID-19 guide for children in Arizona as vaccinations became available. 

Afshari’s artistic talents are also exhibited on the Tempe campus in the form of a painting commissioned by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership that hangs permanently in Coor Hall.

After graduation, Afshari will participate in research at Stanford Medical School and will teach biology with Teach for America. She hopes to inspire the next generation of scientists by reciprocating the compassionate mentorship that guided her throughout her academic journey.

Erin Alexander

Portrait of ASU student Erin Alexander.

Dean’s Medal: School of Earth and Space Exploration
Major: Earth and space exploration
Minor: Biochemistry
Certificate: Field geology

Alexander is a Barrett student who has left a memorable impression on her peers, professors and numerous School of Earth and Space Exploration faculty. 

During her time at ASU, Alexander worked in Everett Shock’s lab evaluating spatial and temporal variability in hot spring chemistry by synthesizing 20 years of data. Her efforts to bring new mapping and data management methods to the group’s Yellowstone National Park research have proven inspiring, and several graduate students in the group have benefited from her contributions.

Alexander also participated in the NASA Space Grant Internship, where she created a map geodatabase and generated 3D models of regions of Yellowstone for geochemical modeling.

After graduation, she will pursue a graduate program to learn more about the interaction between the geomorphology of landscapes and the geochemistry of hydrothermal systems.

Alexander Almeida

Portrait of ASU student Alexander Almeida.

Dean’s Medal: Department of Economics
Majors: Economics, mathematics

Almeida is a Barrett student graduating summa cum laude this spring. During his time at ASU, he served as a peer tutor and teaching assistant and completed multiple research assistantships in the Department of Economics. He has been recognized as a student leader by the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Almeida studied abroad in India and Argentina, and interned at the Federal Reserve doing economic research. He helped direct an environmentally focused portfolio of over $1 million for ASU Enterprise Partners. In his free time, he works with the Gammage Scholars on community-based projects that have been featured in the State Press and tutors local students with RISE Tutoring. 

Almeida will continue doing economic research for the next two years as a research fellow at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. He aspires to earn a graduate degree in economics to continue studying the role that financial markets play in human and environmental betterment.

Cora Baron

Portrait of ASU student Cora Baron.

Dean’s Medal: Department of Psychology
Major: Psychology

Baron, a Barrett student, has a strong interest in understanding how people’s decisions and behaviors are informed by the environment that they are a part of.

During her time at ASU, she assisted in research on issues of social exclusion, social cognition as it relates to advice-giving, cross-sectional research about sexual consent behaviors and the adolescent stress on Latino youth. She served as a research assistant at the Evolution, Ecology, and Social Behavior Lab. She investigated the processes of social exclusion, explored how different situational pressures lead to different behavioral responses, and analyzed how individuals' environments influence how they define diversity.

Outside of the lab, she volunteered as a crisis counselor at Crisis Text Line, served as a coordinator for the GLSEN Phoenix chapter and was an attendant care provider at Arion Care Solutions.

After graduating, Baron plans on furthering her education at the University of California, Santa Barbara in the fall to pursue her PhD in social psychology.

Melia Beccard

Portrait of ASU student Melia Beccard.

Dean’s Medal: School of Social Transformation
Majors: Asian Pacific American studies, psychology
Minor: Social welfare

Beccard is an honors student who is passionate about her work on Korean adoptees, with a focus on helping to create better policies for Asian transracial adoptees and their families.

She has worked as an undergraduate research assistant in two labs — the Yoo Research Lab, where she worked to understand more about literature on the racial and ethnic identity of Asian Americans, and the Perception, Ecological Action, Robotics and Learning Lab, where she analyzed how sensory touch and time perception are correlated. She is also an executive director and tutor for the Refugee Integration, Stability and Education (RISE) organization, where she oversees and manages four tutoring sites.

After graduation, Beccard plans to move to Washington to pursue a master’s degree in social work at the University of Washington.

John Byrd

Portrait of ASU student John Byrd.

Dean’s Medal: Department of Physics
Major: Physics
Minor: Mathematics

Byrd is a Barrett student interested in exploring physics education and student misconceptions in the mathematics of physics.

At ASU, he assisted in the construction of electrodes for neural stimulation at the Neural Microsystems Laboratory and helped Associate Professor David Meltzer to analyze the results of over 8,000 diagnostic surveys to better understand the confusion that afflicts students in physics courses. 

Byrd has worked as a tutor for Coconino Community College and an undergraduate learning assistant for the Department of Physics, where he developed and led structured review sessions for students outside of class.

After graduation, he plans to pursue a PhD in physics at Michigan State University with an emphasis on physics education research.

Theresa DeConcini

Portrait of ASU student Theresa DeConcini.

Dean’s Medal: School of Politics and Global Studies
Major: Global studies 
Minor: Spanish

DeConcini, a Barrett student, is a Virginia native who lived in Tucson, Arizona, who has an interest in environmental equity.

During her time at ASU, DeConcini completed an internship with the office of U.S. Sen. Mark Kelly, where she assisted with constituent communication, casework and research. She has been appointed a Barrett Fellow with ASU’s Office of Gender-Based Violence and has been a content creator and legal board member for the Foreign Policy Youth Collaborative. 

DeConcini is pursuing her master’s in sustainability at ASU in the fall. After she completes the two-year program, she hopes to take a few years off to travel and work, and eventually return to school.

Zane Encinas

Portrait of ASU student Zane Encinas.

Dean’s Medal: Department of English
Majors: Philosophy, English, sustainability
Minor: Sociology
Certificates: Environmental humanities, environmental education, social science research methods

Encinas, a Barrett student, has a passion for exploring the capabilities of interdisciplinary studies to generate new solutions to systemic issues.

Encinas has taken on numerous research and internship opportunities. One is theirEncinas uses they/their pronouns. current position as a research apprentice for the Arizona Youth Identity Project, where they work to gain a better understanding of how young adults in Arizona conceptualize Americanism and how recent social changes affect their understanding of their belonging and national identity.

Encinas has left a lasting impact at ASU as they founded the student organization Climbing Vines. In addition, they have been awarded the Pitchfork Award for Emerging Student Leader due to their various leadership roles as vice president of The Faithful City, director of operations of the Sustainability Alliance, president and recruitment officer for the Honor Society for Sustainability and co-chair of the Sustainability Advocacy and Advisory Board.

Aaron Flores

Portrait of ASU student Aaron Flores.

Dean’s Medal: School of Molecular Sciences
Major: Chemistry

Flores is a first-generation student who has an interest in forensic analysis and quantum computational chemistry.

Since transferring to ASU from community college, Flores has served as a student researcher in the Anbar/METAL supergroup. As an advanced researcher, he contributes to research involving isotopic analysis for trace metals in bullets for forensic investigation. He also wrote grant applications to the American Academy of Forensic Science and gave a presentation at the 2022 Winter Conference on plasma spectrochemisty.

After graduation, Flores aspires to get a PhD in computational chemistry and pursue a career in field service engineering.

Amy Harvey

Portrait of ASU student Amy Harvey.

Dean’s Medal: School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning
Majors: Geographic information science, anthropology
Minor: Art history

Harvey is a first-generation student who has an interest in archeology, spatial analysis and data management.

Harvey’s knowledge of tools such as Python programming, Geographically Weighted Regressions and the complexities of the open source have allowed her to conduct exceptional research. This research includes creating a new ceramics database, thus introducing a new source for use in other archaeological research.

Her post-graduation plans entail taking some time to gain work experience in GIS and cultural resource management, and then pursuing a master’s degree in digital archaeology.

Joshua Herald

Portrait of ASU student Joshua Herald.

Dean’s Medal: School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies
Major: Religious studies (religion, culture and public life)

Herald is a U.S. Navy veteran currently working as a foreign service specialist for the U.S. State Department that has returned to further his education through ASU Online. 

Herald, driven by his academic interest in religion, American politics and culture, has conducted undergraduate research that evaluates Pastor Greg Locke’s public theology. He then relates that to the empirical research on Christian Nationalism by sociologists Andrew L. Whitehead and Samuel L. Perry.

After graduation, he plans to pursue graduate education in religious studies with the long-term goal of teaching the subject.

Francisco Hernandez

Portrait of ASU student Francisco Hernandez.

Dean’s Medal: T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics
Majors: Sociology, Spanish
Certificate: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Hernandez is a first-generation student and father who sought to advance his education through ASU Online.

Hernandez served as the president of the ASU chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, a sociology honors society. He helped revive the society as he rallied faculty to reinstate it, with the chapter now growing to over 40 student members.

After graduation, Hernandez plans to earn a master’s degree in education for TESOL. His long-term goal is to directly impact the lives of those that come to the U.S. in search of better opportunities.

Christopher Hernandez Salinas

Portrait of ASU student Christopher Hernandez Salinas.

Dean’s Medal: School of Transborder Studies
Majors: Biomedical science, global health, transborder Chicano/a and Latino/a studies 
Minors: Health innovation
Certificates: Human rights, interdisciplinary health humanities

Hernandez Salinas, a Barrett student, is motivated to combine his passions for medicine and community involvement.

During his time at ASU, Hernandez Salinas took on five internships, two major volunteer opportunities and has assisted with research at the Genes, Environment and Youth Development laboratory. He worked more than 500 hours volunteering at Phoenix Allies for Community Health, where he assisted with clinical flow and COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

After graduation, he will attend the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona. He plans to complete a master’s degree and work with marginalized communities to address health inequities through nonprofit work, health policy and health equity research.

Ellianna Lederman

Portrait of ASU student Ellianna Lederman.

Dean’s Medal: School of Human Evolution and Social Change
Major: Global health
Certificates: Public administration and public management

Lederman is a Barrett student who has a passion for global health and merging academia and public service.

Since her freshman year, she has been the co-president of the Global Health Student Association. In addition, she has played a significant role as a COVID-19 case investigator for ASU’s Student Outbreak Response Team and had research positions at both the Children in the Law Laboratory and the COVID-19 and Racial Health Disparities Lab.

After graduation, she will continue her education at the Colorado School of Public Health, where she will pursue a master's degree in public health in health systems, management and policy.

Trent Lindstrom

Portrait of ASU student Trent Lindstrom.

Dean’s Medal: School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Major: Mathematics (statistics)

Lindstrom, a Barrett student, has a passion for statistical science, organization and data analytics.

Lindstrom’s goal for his honors thesis project was to use statistics to be able to predict what makes collegiate sports teams successful. As a result, he created a model that predicts the results of Pac-12 college football games.

He also held a student worker position at the W. P. Carey School of Business. As a data analyst, he assisted on a modeling project meant to help predict what factors go into the ranking of the business school across a variety of degrees and publications.

After graduation, he will continue his Sun Devil journey and return to ASU to complete an accelerated master's degree in statistics.

Daniel O’Hara

Portrait of ASU student Daniel O’Hara.

Dean’s Medal: School of International Letters and Cultures
Major: Asian languages (Chinese)

O’Hara is a midshipman of the ASU Naval Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and a scholar of the Chinese Language Flagship Program a proficiency-driven undergraduate language training program funded by the Department of Defense.

When he first came to ASU, O'Hara was driven by his passion for language and cultural studies. Despite his schedule as a midshipman, O’Hara still excelled academically. By his third year at ASU, he had already attained a solid advanced mid- to high-level of proficiency in his Chinese skills. 

After graduation, he aims to become a foreign area officer in the Navy and contribute to regional and global security. 

Freddy Soto

Portrait of ASU student Freddy Soto.

Dean’s Medal: Hugh Downs School of Human Communication
Major: Communication
Minors: Public service and public policy, justice studies
Certificate: Civil communication

Soto entered ASU as a first-generation college student. He is a Barrett student, a legislative intern and served as a page for the Arizona House of Representatives. As an intern with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI), he advocated for legislation such as affordable housing incentives to help Arizonans in need.  

Soto volunteers as a basketball coach for the city of Tempe, working with kids at summer camp and as a tutor for the Refugee, Integration, Stability and Education (RISE) organization.

Alek Bustamante Valdez

Marketing assistant , The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Dean's Medalist dedicates his career to preserving America's constitutional democracy

Gregory Abbott follows his passion for US history and civic education


April 25, 2022

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

A Phoenix native, Gregory Abbott entered Arizona State University in 2018 after graduating from Brophy College Preparatory with a much different perspective than the one he has today. Gregory Abbott Dean’s Medalist Gregory Abbott Download Full Image

“I always had an interest in the U.S. Constitution and political thought, but my original major was biological science,” he said.

One night, though, his father mentioned he had heard about a new ASU program, one focused on civic and economic thought and leadership.

“We checked out the (School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership) website that evening and I decided to take a course,” Abbott said.

His first course at the school was CEL 100 with Professor Karen Taliaferro. 

“I was intimidated at first, but I fell in love with the Socratic seminars and with the opportunity to share my ideas. Slowly, I became more confident and pushed myself. It was a growth process,” he said.

The following semester, he took CEL 200 Great Debates in American Politics with Professor Zachary German.

“I was hooked. I switched to a major in civic and economic thought and leadership and never looked back,” he says.

Abbott graduates in spring 2022 with a Bachelor of Science in civic and economic thought and leadership and brings home the 2022 Dean’s Medal, but his journey has just begun.

In May, he moves to the University of Notre Dame campus in Indiana to begin his graduate studies in education. We talked to him about his experience at ASU, his career goals and about receiving the Dean’s Medal.

Question: How has the School of Economic Thought and Leadership impacted you?

Answer: I came in very cynical about our country, but by learning about our government, its institutions, the fragile equilibrium between the different powers, the compromises and the genius of our constitutional democracy, I gained a deep respect for it. I learned that it all relies on compromises and civil disagreement. And this made me want to help preserve it. It is our task to make it last.

Q: What is your ultimate goal?

A: My goal is to remain dedicated to being a part of the conversations to find common ground to solve the civics crisis in America. I plan on becoming an American history and civics teacher at the high school level.

Q: What do the next two years look like for you?

A: The program I’m entering at the University of Notre Dame has a teaching component. I will teach in Florida for two years during my master’s, then I intend to apply for the doctorate program in constitutional studies at the same university. 

Q: What makes the school special?

A: It feels like family. My favorite part is the (school's) community, something I never expected to find in such a large university. It is much more than I had expected. The tight community gave me the confidence to apply for fellowships, courses and opportunities.

Q: What would you say to an incoming School of Economic Thought and Leadership student?

A: The (school's) education is more than studying history. It’s more than studying political science. And it’s more than studying philosophy. It’s learning about those subject matters to find ways to make our country stronger. In essence, it combines critical thinking and analytical skills for the purpose of improving society.

Q: Your career path shows your passion for civic education. How did your professors impact you?

A: I feel immense gratitude for (the school) for making me a student, who loves to learn and grow, and receiving the Dean’s Medal is a symbolic representation of the (school) community’s faith in me.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

What is the role of the university in the 21st century?

Event at ASU highlights the importance of intellectual diversity, civil disagreement on and beyond campus


April 5, 2022

On April 13, John Tomasi, inaugural president of Heterodox Academy, will present a lecture titled "Is the Goal of the University to Pursue Knowledge or Social Justice?"

The event takes place from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union’s Turquoise Room on the Tempe campus. Illustration of two heads facing each other. Inside the heads are illustrations of cogs and gears. Download Full Image

“The traditional purpose of the university is the pursuit of truth, with attention to the discovery and dissemination of knowledge. Today, however, many universities seem to have adopted a different mission: the achievement of social justice,” Tomasi says.

He will discuss how these different expectations cause conflicts on campus and beyond.

His lecture is part of the The Civic Discourse Project, a series of lectures that feature some of the country’s most respected public intellectuals and leaders, co-sponsored by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership and the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU.

Registration is now open for in-person attendance, and the event will also be livestreamed on YouTube

In this lecture, Tomasi will elaborate on how the different contemporary goals of the university relate to each other, how this choice affects the organizational structures of universities and how we can ensure the promotion of viewpoint diversity on the university campus as the foundation necessary for the education and learning of students.

“By defending the principle of viewpoint diversity, we stand up for the principle that every person and group in our society, the weak as well as the strong, has a perspective that matters,” Tomasi said. “By insisting that every voice be heard, we express respect for our fellow citizens. It is a moral principle.”

For well over a decade, we have seen a persistent pattern of claims on campus that ‘I shouldn’t hear other points of view because they’re despicable, they’re immoral or they’re just wrong.'

— Paul Carrese, founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at ASU

This commitment to intellectual diversity is also at the forefront at the School of Economic Thought and Leadership, through the school’s academic offerings, K–12 civic education programs and The Civic Discourse Project. 

“For well over a decade, we have seen a persistent pattern of claims on campus that ‘I shouldn’t hear other points of view because they’re despicable, they’re immoral or they’re just wrong,’” said Paul Carrese, founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at ASU. “There are some kinds of discourse on university campuses that are not appropriate, but within that set of parameters, there is an enormous amount of thinking and debating to do.”

In the April 13 lecture, Tomasi will discuss the role of higher education institutions in providing spaces for divergent opinions, and how this affects America’s political environment. 

“(The school) supports the mission of Heterodox Academy to promote intellectual diversity and the open exchange of ideas in the classroom, in public forums and in faculty research at the university,” said Carol McNamara, associate director of public programs at the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. “We invited John Tomasi to enhance the conversation at (the school) and ASU about the importance of viewpoint diversity.”

John Tomasi

John Tomasi, president of Heterodox Academy.

Before joining Heterodox Academy, Tomasi taught and wrote about political theory and public policy at Brown University, where he held the position of Romeo Elton 1843 Professor of Natural Theology. At Brown, he founded and directed the Political Theory Project, an independent research center that supports scholarship and encourages political dialogue on campus. 

Tomasi is the author of “Liberalism Beyond Justice: Citizens, Society and the Boundaries of Political Theory” (Princeton University Press, 2001) and “Free Market Fairness” (Princeton University Press, 2012), as well as several scholarly articles. He completed his graduate work in political philosophy at the University of Arizona (MA) and Oxford University (Bachelor of Philosophy and Doctor of Philosophy). Tomasi currently holds an appointment at the University of Arizona’s Center for the Philosophy of Freedom, where he is a university associate and research professor.

The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership is an academic unit inside The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Founded in 2017, the school combines liberal arts education with outside-the-classroom learning experiences to prepare students for leadership roles in the public and private sectors. The school hosts a robust public programming schedule in its Civic Discourse Project, which addresses the pressing issues of our times and is aired on Arizona PBS. All lectures are free, open to the public and available for viewing at scetl.asu.edu and on YouTube.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

Lessons in leadership and public service

Former US Air Force Secretary and former US Rep. Heather Wilson to discuss ethical dilemmas in government service


March 24, 2022

The United States of America is in constant change and under great pressure from many directions. As new challenges to government arise and increasing demands surface each day, public servants face expectations and ethical dilemmas that most citizens can’t even fathom.

How can public officials guide their decisions with virtue in the midst of a rapidly changing environment domestically and internationally? Portrait of former U.S Air Force Secretary and former U.S. Rep. Heather Wilson. Former U.S Air Force Secretary and former U.S. Rep. Heather Wilson.

Heather Wilson has a few suggestions. Over the last three decades, Wilson has been at the forefront of many of our country’s most challenging moments, transitioning between the U.S. Congress, the Air Force, the private sector and public education. On Tuesday, March 29, she will speak at Arizona State University about the lessons she has learned in leadership positions.

This event is part of the the Civic Discourse Project, a series of lectures with some of the country’s most respected intellectuals and leaders. The program is co-sponsored by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership and the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law.

Registration is now open for in-person attendance, and the event will also be livestreamed on YouTube.

“Heather Wilson is a respected and effective public servant, leader in the private sector, pilot and president of the University of Texas at El Paso,” said Paul Carrese, founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. “We will certainly learn important lessons from her and gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced daily in public office by men and women leading and serving our country and our communities.”

Wilson joined the University of Texas at El Paso after serving as Secretary of the United States Air Force. She is the former president of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, an engineering and science research university in Rapid City, South Dakota, and represented New Mexico in the United States Congress for 10 years. Wilson has also worked in the private sector, serving as a senior adviser to the defense and scientific industry and as president of Keystone International, a company she founded that conducted business development and program planning work.

Wilson was the first person in her family to attend college. She graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in the third class to admit women and earned her master's and doctoral degrees in international relations from Oxford University in England as a Rhodes Scholar. She and her husband, Jay Hone, have three adult children. 

The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership is an academic unit inside The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. Founded in 2017, the school combines liberal arts education with outside-the-classroom learning experiences to prepare students for leadership roles in the public and private sectors. The school also hosts a robust public programming schedule in its Civic Discourse Project, which addresses the pressing issues of our times and is aired on Arizona PBS. All lectures are free, open to the public and available for viewing at scetl.asu.edu and on YouTube. For more information about the school's academic offerings and events, visit scetl.asu.edu.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

Constitutional awareness advances students' careers

Course offered in the fall at ASU is great preparation for careers in law, public office, teaching, business and journalism


March 24, 2022

How can a 235-year-old text help students develop the skills to become successful professionals and citizens in the 21st century?

In a nutshell, constitutional awareness allows us to understand the role civic responsibility plays in America, and this fall, Arizona State University students have the opportunity to dissect the U.S. Constitution, the separation of powers and structures of government — specifically federalism — and the rule of law.  Cover of the U.S. pocket constitution published by ASU's School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. It reads: We the People of the United States. Cover of the U.S. pocket constitution published by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. Download Full Image

Enrollment is now open for CEL 494 - The American Constitution I (class #88635) taught by Aaron Kushner and offered by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership on Mondays and Wednesdays, from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. in Tempe. Learn more here.

CEL 494 is the first of a two-part sequence on the American Constitution aimed at “cultivating educated leaders, professionals and citizens who are well-versed in constitutional law and many of its implications,” said Kushner, which makes this course great preparation for careers in such fields as law, public office, teaching, business and journalism, among others

“American Constitution I is structured to focus on three main areas,” Kushner said. “We will begin by studying the text of the Constitution itself, then analyze the nature of constitutional authority by examining where claimed government powers properly belong. Finally, we will explore how constitutional interpretation has developed over time.”

In this course, students will read a variety of texts from the U.S. Constitution to Supreme Court decisions to political speeches on the nature of government and power itself. Taught in an environment based around discussions, which prompts students to engage with both each other and the material, CEL 494 will encourage students to dive into the complexities and different interpretations of the Constitution. 

This course is an opportunity to develop both critical thinking skills and strong writing habits.

— Professor Aaron Kushner

Portrait of ASU postdoctoral scholar .

Aaron Kushner

“Students will understand the structures and division of powers created under the U.S. Constitution and which institutions rightly exercise each power,” Kushner said. “They will also be exposed to major theories and debates over constitutional interpretation and justifications for and assumptions contained in each.”

At the end of this course, students will be able to understand different ways of interpreting the Constitution and how to engage with other legal texts. They will discuss, for example, the opposition between originalism and living constitutionalism. 

“This course is an opportunity to develop both critical thinking skills and strong writing habits since students will write regular reflections on the material,” said Kushner, who earned his doctorate in political science at the University of Missouri. He is the assistant director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership's Living Repository of the Arizona Constitution initiative and is currently working on a book titled “Ruling or Being Ruled? The Development of Cherokee Political Thought.”

The second course of this two-part sequence will focus on civil rights and civil liberties, though these will be touched on in American Constitution I. The two courses fit under the school's overarching mission to educate in American constitutional principles.

As part of its efforts to achieve this goal, the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership publishes and distributes pocket versions of the U.S. Constitution followed by three other crucial texts: the Declaration of Independence, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream'' address. Together, these four documents are the fundamental charters of the most enduring form of liberal democracy the world has ever known.

“The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership seeks to restore the nexus of classical liberal education and fundamental civic education so that students are prepared to understand and practice civic leadership in 21st century America and our globalized world,” added Paul Carrese, founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership.

American Constitution I is part of the fall 2022 list of courses offered by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership, an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The school combines philosophy, history, economics and political science to examine great ideas and solve contemporary problems. To learn more about the school, visit scetl.asu.edu.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

Spring breakers take inventory of life, love and leadership

18 ASU students participate in life-changing experiential course offered by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership


March 21, 2022

For students across the country, spring break is an opportunity to reset mid-semester and let loose from school. But for 18 Arizona State University students, the week of March 7–13 was a chance to reflect on larger-than-life questions and to engage in activities to achieve a fulfilled life experience.

They enrolled in CEL 394 — Leading a Life of Meaning, an experiential course offered annually by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and LeadershipThe group traveled to Prescott, Arizona, for an immersive six-day program of extensive readings, dialogue, bonding and community service.  ASU students pose for a group photo in a nature setting. The 2022 "Leading a Life of Meaning" cohort in Prescott, Arizona. Download Full Image

”This course has made me think differently about every aspect of my life,” wrote student Sophia Herman. “The blend of liberal and experiential education changed something in me. It was exactly what I needed to get out of the rut I’ve been in.”

Through this course, students from a variety of schools retreated to Prescott to read texts ranging from Aristotle and Rumi to Toni Morrison and Wendell Berry. Based on the readings, they brought to bear their own life experiences — to understand concepts of love, friendship, work, community and identity in relation to living an examined life.

These studies were then expanded through practical experiences of service work, meditation and films such as "Good Will Hunting" and "Pride and Prejudice."

Student reading at front of class.

ASU student Olivia Stanley reads to classmates.

“Grounding the internal conversations about meaning with why we need to have those conversations for ourselves and for the world was especially helpful in making these lessons be something that last a lifetime and not just a week after we get back,” said Kayleigh Steele, who is pursuing a major in data science at ASU’s School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences and a minor in civic and economic thought and leadership at the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership.

In the afternoons, students completed written assignments, reflected among themselves, participated in a trail building project and a “where I’m from” poetry recitation, and mailed a gratitude letter. The readings were completed as a group and, combined with discussions over meals and Socratic seminars, totaled seven hours per day.

Leading a Life of Meaning is taught by Susan Carrese, clinical assistant professor, and Carol McNamara, associate director for public programs for the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership. 

Still, there was time for s’mores, hikes, charades, making snowmen and new friends,” Carrese said.

This course is intended to develop a tight cohort of ASU students from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds who encounter liberal education, classic texts and Socratic seminars in an intensive, supportive and beautiful environment.

— ASU Clinical Assistant Professor Susan Carrese

The assessment for the course was also designed to allow students to home in on liberal learning.

“In this course, we focus on a deepened understanding of classical and contemporary texts, and on creating a place for students to reflect on their own personal and professional education and paths through life,” McNamara said. “The course’s assessment challenges students to engage with poetry and political philosophy to develop strong reading, writing and communication skills.”

Spanning works from Ancient Greece to modern life, students acquired a new vocabulary for understanding concepts of fulfillment, love, work, leisure and community. Through an intensive cohort experience, they developed a sense of intellectual community and shared pursuit of self-understanding and friendship. They discussed issues regarding work-life balance, identity, leadership and service. Finally, the service project inspired them to become active members of their communities.

“Each year, Professor McNamara and I have the privilege of spending six days with students in Prescott, and we are always amazed by how much this learning experience helps them cultivate critical thinking, to passionately pursue a fulfilled life, lead through inspirational example, develop stronger writing and communication skills, and become engaged actors in their communities as a result of the seminar setting, conversations, activities and experiences we shared during this extraordinary time together,” Carrese said.

CEL 394 — Leading a Life of Meaning is a part of the list of courses offered by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership, an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The school combines philosophy, history, economics and political science to examine great ideas and solve contemporary problems. Courses such as Comparative Political Thought; Debating Capitalism; and Politics and Leadership in the Age of Revolutions: 1776-1826 prepare students for careers in such fields as business, law, public office, philanthropy, teaching and journalism, among others. To learn more about the school, visit scetl.asu.edu.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

'Keeping It Civil' podcast dedicated to improving civil discourse

ASU-Arizona PBS production proves it is possible to disagree on controversial topics without shouting, name-calling


March 16, 2022

From a young age, Americans are often told to avoid controversial topics such as politics and race. But avoiding them altogether may have contributed to today’s political polarization. Instead, Americans should engage in civil discourse. That is the rationale behind the relaunch of the podcast "Keeping It Civil," a partnership between Arizona State University's School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership (SCETL) and Arizona PBS.

"Keeping It Civil" is dedicated to creating space for disagreement on relevant topics and bridging political polarization through civil discourse. In each episode, hosts Joshua Sellers and Henry Thomson interview prominent intellectuals, authors and scholars with diverging views on pressing issues in America. Guests discuss a wide range of topics, including political reform, systemic racism and racial disparities, free speech on campus, meritocracy and populism.  Illustration of two heads facing different directions. A brainwave symbol is depicted where the heads intersect. At the bottom, it reads "Keeping it Civil."

Sellers is an associate professor of law at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU. He is an expert on American politics and American election law. 

“This is unlike anything I’ve done so far in my career, and I appreciate the opportunity to converse with these respected scholars, authors and intellectuals about some of America’s greatest challenges,” said Sellers, a lawyer and scholar with degrees from the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago.

Originally from New Zealand, Thomson is an assistant professor of political science in ASU's School of Politics and Global Studies.

“Josh and I met at a new faculty orientation five years ago. We have become good friends, and although we don’t agree on everything, we both love intellectual discussion and debate,” said Thomson.

Upcoming episodes feature Jonathan Rauch, Steven B. Smith, H. R. McMaster, Glenn Loury, Khalil Muhammad, Lara Bazelon, Andrew Sullivan, Kmele Foster and John Tomasi, among others. The podcast’s emphasis on civil disagreement aligns with SCETL’s mission and is an integral part of the Civic Discourse Project, which brings civic leaders, academics and public intellectuals to the ASU campus.

“It is a university — it's not a public park, it's not a political campaign. It's a distinctive kind of discourse meant to be more reasonable, meant to be more civil than other spaces of disagreement. That is the broader mission underlying the school’s educational and public offerings,” said Paul Carrese, director of SCETL.

Portrait of ASU Professor Joshua Sellers.

Co-host Joshua Sellers

 “SCETL’s mission involves students, faculty and the community at large in broad discussions about compelling and challenging issues of our times. That is how the Civic Discourse Project was born: as a public, civic discourse between SCETL and the broader Arizona community,” added Carol McNamara, SCETL’s associate director for public programs.

“At Arizona PBS, our goal is to keep the citizens of this state connected, not only to educational resources and informational programming, but also to each other and to the important discussions taking place in our communities and beyond,” said Adrienne Fairwell, the general manager at Arizona PBS. “A true, collaborative effort, this podcast perfectly aligns with that mission. We look forward to hearing the timely conversations between some of our country’s top thought leaders and our podcast hosts.”

Overseeing the production is Regina Revazova, founder of Open Conversation and a faculty associate at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. She works closely with both Arizona PBS and SCETL to deliver a top-quality production. 

“'Keeping it Civil' is a one-of-a-kind content that offers in-depth conversations with the brightest thinkers of our time. I'm so glad this will be available to the public, and (I'm) honored to be a part of this project,” said Revazova.

"Keeping it Civil" is available on all major platforms, including Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher Radio, iTunes and Google Play. 

Portrait of ASU Professor Henry Thomson.

Co-host Henry Thomson

SCETL is an academic unit inside The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. The school combines a liberal arts education with outside-the-classroom learning experiences to prepare its students for leadership roles in the 21st century. The school has also developed a robust public programming schedule in the Civic Discourse Project, which addresses the pressing issues of our times, aired on PBS Arizona. For more information about the school, visit scetl.asu.edu

Arizona PBS is one of the nation’s leading public media organizations, with four broadcast channels and a growing array of digital platforms. A trusted community resource for nearly 60 years, Arizona PBS fosters lifelong learning through quality programming, in-depth news coverage and critical educational outreach services. The station's signal reaches 80% of homes in Arizona, delivering news, science, arts and children’s programming to 1.9 million households each week. Arizona PBS is a member-supported community service of Arizona State University, based at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in the heart of downtown Phoenix. Learn more at azpbs.org.

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

ASU course shines light on common threads of the 'Atlantic Revolutions'

CEL 375 examines the American, French, Haitian and Latin American revolutions of 1776–1826


March 14, 2022

Even though they are more like apples and oranges, historians and politicians have long succumbed to the temptation to compare the American and the French revolutions. But it is far more important and interesting to examine what they had in common, together with their sequels in the Caribbean and Latin America.

“It’s only recently that historians have admitted that the American, French, Haitian and Latin American revolutions at the end of the 18th and early 19th centuries were not discrete historical episodes, but formed a kind of chain, one leading to the other,” said Kent Wright, associate professor in Arizona State University's School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership Map of the world indicating where the American, French, Haitian and Latin American revolutions of 1776-1826 took place. CEL 375 - Politics and Leadership in the Age of Revolutions, 1776-1826 examines the American, French, Haitian and Latin American revolutions of the time period.

Today, he explained, one of the most popular trends in historiography is to explore how these revolutions were related to one another, at the levels of economics, politics and ideology.

In fall 2022, Wright will introduce students to what historians now refer to as “The Atlantic Revolutions” in CEL 375 Politics and Leadership in the Age of Revolutions, 1776–1826  (class #94802, meeting Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:30–11:45 a.m.). 

“CEL 375 is a hybrid, interdisciplinary course with different aims," Wright said. "Students will build a solid introduction to the historiography of the period, for which we will use Wim Klooster’s new edition of his ‘Revolutions in the Atlantic World,’ a synoptic survey of the entire set of Atlantic upheavals. We will also focus on the political thinking of the era — not just the famous essays and treatises by the likes of Montesquieu and Rousseau, Paine, Burke, Wollstonecraft, de Staël and Constant, Guzman and Marina — but also the flood of declarations, of independence and rights and constitution-making that accompanied the revolutions.”

This is the founding moment for modern politics, the epoch that gave birth to democracy and republicanism, nationalism and imperialism, conservativism, liberalism and progressivism, feminism and abolitionism, roughly as we still know them today.

— Associate Professor Kent Wright

The turbulent period from 1776 to 1826 was marked by revolutionary uprisings in the Americas and Europe overthrowing aristocracies, kings and the established Catholic church, and the spread of new ideas

"This is the founding moment for modern politics, the epoch that gave birth to democracy and republicanism, nationalism and imperialism, conservativism, liberalism and progressivism, feminism and abolitionism, roughly as we still know them today," Wright said. "While I’m a little skeptical about the idea of ‘leadership’ as an object of scholarly study, if there were ever an era in which to pursue it, the age of revolutions would be it." 

In CEL 375, students will consider the topic of "charismatic leadership" by reading David Bell’s recent survey “Men on Horseback: the Power of Charisma in the Age of Revolution.” They will then examine biographies, and each student will have the opportunity to study classic and recent biographies of leading figures of the era: Washington, Adams and Jefferson; Danton, Robespierre and Napoleon; Toussaint Louverture, Miranda, Bolívar, O’Higgins and San Martín, to list a few.

Professor Kent Wright

Associate Professor Kent Wright

Wright has taught at ASU for nearly 28 years. Before joining the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at its creation in 2017, he taught first in the interdisciplinary humanities program, then in the History Department, where he served as both director of undergraduate students and head of the faculty.

A native of Michigan, he did his graduate studies at the University of Chicago, where he specialized in modern intellectual history in general, and the era of the Enlightenment and French Revolution in particular. Wright is the author of “A Classical Republican in Eighteenth-Century France: the Political Thought of Mably” (Stanford). He is completing a book for Cambridge, “The Revolutionary Atlantic, 1750-1830,” and at work on two others: “A Bright, Clear Mirror: the Enlightenment in Modern Thought” and an intellectual biography of Montesquieu. He has published numerous essays, articles and book chapters on Montesquieu and Rousseau, as well as on 18th- and 20th-century European historiography. From 2011 to 2014, Wright also served as editor of the journal French Historical Studies.

Wright's class integrates the fall 2022 list of courses offered by the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership, an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The school combines philosophy, history, economics and political science to examine great ideas and solve contemporary problems. Courses such as Comparative Political Thought, Tocqueville: Problems and Prospects of American Democracy, and Globalism, Nationalism and Citizenship prepare students for careers in fields including business, law, public office, philanthropy, teaching and journalism.  

Marcia Paterman Brookey

Manager of marketing and communications, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership

918-859-3013

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