Thunderbird 4+1 programs help graduate gain competitive advantage


Photo of Frederick Rauner

For Frederick Rauner, one of his undergraduate career highlights was meeting and befriending a peer and diplomat for Sierra Leone during one of the in-person sessions. “To me, two people from completely different worlds working together and creating a friendship is what Thunderbird is about,” he said.

|

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

Global management undergraduate Frederick Rauner holds many passions; being a part of the Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University and improving society are two major ones.

“The thing I love most about being a T-bird is being part of something bigger than myself,” said Rauner. “Thunderbird is not just a school. It is a community of people working together to make the world a better place through humanitarian action and commerce.”

Rauner earned a Bachelor of Global Management from Thunderbird and is continuing his education in a 4+1 program and plans to earn his Master of Applied Leadership and Management, with a concentration in global and public affairs.

“As part of the 4+1 program, I attended in-person sessions in the new F. Francis and Dionne Najafi Thunderbird Global Headquarters,” said Rauner. “The sessions helped create a bigger connection for me to Thunderbird and a better understanding of its history. One of my undergraduate career highlights is meeting one of my peers, Pat Kamara nee Sondai, a diplomat for Sierra Leone, during one of the in-person sessions. To me, two people from completely different worlds working together and creating a friendship is what Thunderbird is about.” 

As for words of wisdom, Frederick offers the following advice: “T-birds are unique, diverse and adventurous. Be open to them and their experiences.”

Question: If someone gave you $40 million to solve one problem on our planet, what would you tackle?

Answer: With $40 million dollars, I would begin to work on the world’s energy crisis. Boosting renewable energy globally will increase energy independence and the ability of developing nations to grow sustainably.

Q: Which professor taught you the most important lesson while at Thunderbird?

A: Dr. Roy Nelson has been an amazing guide and mentor to me in this program. The most important lesson I learned from him is fully valuing myself and my experience.

Q: What advice would you give to a student just starting a program at Thunderbird?

Answer: I have two pieces of advice:

  1. Take brief calculus ASAP.
  2. Embrace the experience.

Q: For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

A: I am most grateful for my family. I could not have made it through this program without their support and understanding.

More Science and technology

 

Graphic illustration of daphnia, a form of zooplankton.

Study challenges traditional views of evolution

In new research, Arizona State University scientists and their colleagues investigated genetic changes occurring in a naturally…

A studio portrait of Kyle Jensen, wearing a white shirt on a dark background lit with orange lighting

Understanding how our perception of AI affects its use

Editor's note: This expert Q&A is part of our “AI is everywhere ... now what?” special project exploring the potential (and…

A magicians hat and wand on a flat maroon background

Demystifying AI in higher education

Editor's note: This expert Q&A is part of our “AI is everywhere ... now what?” special project exploring the potential (and…