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A geologist’s grand jeté

ASU geologist Christy Till describes what it’s like to take the leap from dancer to scientist — and explores the hidden life of magma


ASU geologist Christy Till
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November 27, 2018

In the latest ASU KEDtalk, Christy Till, an assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, tells us how she went from ballet dancer to geologist, one who pieces together the life stories of magma bodies, the molten rock that lives beneath Earth’s surface.

Till collects lava deposits and analyzes the tiny crystals that inhabit them. That’s because the crystals’ composition could one day help us build an early-warning system for volcanic eruptions, like the ones we have for earthquakes. 

Till's talk is part of the ASU KEDtalks series. Short for Knowledge Enterprise Development talks, KEDtalks aim to spark ideas, indulge curiosity and inspire action by highlighting ASU scientists, humanists, social scientists and artists who are driven to find solutions to the universe’s grandest challenges. Tune in to research.asu.edu/kedtalks to discover how researchers are attacking locust plagues, why baby steps are not the best way to achieve change and more.

Top photo by Deanna Dent/ASU Now

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