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Staying ahead of cyberattacks

During National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, ASU's Paulo Shakarian shares how he and other researchers are using cybercriminals' weaknesses against them


ASU Assistant Professor Paulo Shakarian
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October 15, 2018

Cyberattacks make the headlines seemingly every week, with few untouched by the breaches. But there is positive news as researchers take aim at malicious hackers.

In the newest ASU KEDtalk, Paulo Shakarian tells us how mining the dark web can throw light on these cybercriminals and thwart their impending attacks. He likens his research strategy to that of a soldier running reconnaissance on the enemy.

Shakarian, an Arizona State University assistant professor in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, explains that like all of us, malicious hackers have their limitations and weaknesses. He and his collaborators are taking advantage of both to head off cybercriminals at the pass.

Shakarian's talk is part of the ASU KEDtalks series. Short for Knowledge Enterprise Development talks, KEDtalks aim to spark ideas, indulge curiosity and inspire action by highlighting ASU scientists, humanists, social scientists and artists who are driven to find solutions to the universe’s grandest challenges. Tune in to research.asu.edu/kedtalks to discover how researchers are attacking locust plagues, why baby steps are not the best way to achieve change and more.

Top photo by Deanna Dent/ASU Now

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