Skip to main content

ASU team hits Miami seeking sustainable future

ASU team shares design strategies at Design Miami — an influential, international conference for design and the arts


Two people talking

|
December 06, 2016

Led by Herberger Institute faculty, a team of ASU students has recently returned from an international conference for designers, architects and developers where they discussed how to hit United Nations goals for prosperity and sustainability.

ASU’s group — including Dean Steven J. Tepper and students from journalism, film and sculpture — presented a series of talks at the Design Miami conference from expert speakers, discussing sustainable design strategies, which are part on the United Nation's landmark Paris Agreement and increasingly important as the world’s urban population grows.  

According to a U.N. talking-points paper: “The way in which cities, buildings and shelters are built today is highly unsustainable and needs to change. The decisions made about how these cities are built and how industries grow, thrive and employ will impact generations.”

Design Miami, held alongside the Art Basel international art fair each December, touts itself as “the premier venue for collecting, exhibiting, discussing and creating collectible design.” It features panel discussions, gallery shows, lectures and networking opportunities. Tepper saw it as a key opportunity to introduce the U.N. sustainable development goals, calling on the influencers in attendance to build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.      

“Transforming the way in which infrastructure is designed and built — with a focus on low-emission and resilient construction — will require a new level of commitment from designers, architects and developers,” the U.N. talking points read. 

The Paris Agreement’s 17 goals to transform the world by 2030, include eliminating poverty, hunger and gender equality while increasing access to  affordable energy, clean water and sanitation, and responsible consumption and production.

According to the U.N., the majority of the world’s population lives in cities today. By 2050, over 65 percent of people are projected to be living in urban areas. The paper said “design infrastructure and industries will determine the future of not only environmental health in these cities, but also the health and safety of the residents who live in these cities.”

Assisting Tepper deliver the message were three ASU faculty and four students, who interned with CNN Style, the official media sponsor of Design Miami. In addition to helping CNN with their coverage of the event, they also produced a 90-second digital video, which will be aired next week on CNN’s website and Facebook page.

Andrew Noble, a graduate 3-D and virtual reality sculpture in ASU’s School of Art, said the video couldn’t be more timely or relevant.

“We have someone entering office who doesn’t necessarily believe in climate change and the environmental impacts currently taking place,” Noble said.

Sustainability, journalism student Jiahui Jia said, can mean much more than impacts to the environment.

“It can be expanded to bigger ideas like gender equality and poverty,” said Jia, a graduate student in the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication. “It’s good for a journalist to be exposed to a wide variety of experiences. Now I can apply the concepts of sustainability when I do a story.”

For film major Rebecca Wilson, her week in Miami turned out to be a cornucopia of contacts.

“I took the initiative to network and that was a priceless experience,” said Wilson, who is a senior in ASU’s School of Film, Dance and Theater. “I met some pretty amazing designers and architects who are looking forward to hearing from me after I graduate.”

Tepper said the Miami trip produced several good outcomes. He specifically cited the student experience with CNN; a deepening relationship with the senior leadership at the UN and plans to explore partnerships with other foundations around art and sustainability.

Photo: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Dean Steven J. Tepper. 

More Environment and sustainability

 

View of a container filled with apples in the foreground and a truck in the background.

New free, science-based tool offers insights into sustainability priorities

While more and more businesses are beginning to recognize the benefits of sustainable practices, putting them into action can be confusing and time consuming. The Sustainability Consortium (TSC), a…

Person stands in front of a white truck with an urban city in the background

ASU-led lab to host community night at Desert Botanical Garden

The Southwest Urban Corridor Integrated Field Laboratory (SW-IFL) will host its very first community night this summer, inviting the public to delve into its groundbreaking research focused on…

A diver takes notes underwater

ASU celebrates World Ocean Day by honoring BIOS’ 120 years of marine research

The ASU Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (ASU BIOS), one of the world’s longest-running research and educational institutions, held a symposium and community reception in Bermuda using World Ocean…