Weinstein's essay featured in prominent court decision


March 25, 2011

James">http://apps.law.asu.edu/Apps/Faculty/Faculty.aspx?individual_id=137">James Weinstein, the Amelia Lewis Professor of Constitutional Law, and his essay, “Extreme Speech, Public Order and Democracy,” from his book, Extreme Speech and Democracy, were cited in the England and Wales High Court (Administrative Court) Decisions of the case Munim Abdul and Others and Director of Public Prosecutions.

The essay, which examines the different legal responses of various democracies toward extreme expression and hate speech, was cited by Justice Davis who argued that it provided the “most interesting and powerful critique.” Download Full Image

Read the case here.

Weinstein">http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2011/247.html">here.’s areas of academic interest are constitutional law, especially free speech, as well as jurisprudence, federal courts, civil procedure and legal history. He is co-editor of Extreme Speech and Democracy, and has written numerous articles in law review symposia on a variety of free speech topics, including: obscenity doctrine, institutional review boards, commercial speech, database protection, campaign finance reform, the relationship between free speech and other constitutional rights, hate crimes, and campus speech codes. He has also has written several articles on the history of personal jurisdiction and its implication for modern doctrine.

Staci McCabe, Staci.McCabe">mailto:Staci.McCabe@asu.edu">Staci.McCabe@asu.edu
(480) 965-8702
Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law

Bender quoted in 'Tribune' about birthright citizenship


March 25, 2011

Paul">http://apps.law.asu.edu/Apps/Faculty/Faculty.aspx?individual_id=23">Paul Bender, professor of law and dean emeritus, was quoted in a March 18 East Valley Tribune article titled, “Bills’ failure a setback for supporters of ending birthright citizenship,” by reporter Andrew Hedlund.

The article discussed the failure of two controversial immigration bills, SB1308 and SB1309, to pass the state senate. The bills would have worked together to end birthright citizenship for children born to parents who are here illegally. Download Full Image

Bender explained the importance of the first sentence of Section 1 of the 14th Amendment, which was adopted to reverse the 1857 U.S. Supreme Court ruling of Dredd Scott v. Sanford, and guarantee birthright citizenship.

“I think the people who adopted that really meant it—because you are born in the United States, you are a citizen,” Bender said.

To read the entire article, click here.

Bender">http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/arizona/article_1e870908-51b1-11e0-9654... teaches courses on U.S. and Arizona constitutional law. He has written extensively about constitutional law, intellectual property and Indian law, and is co-author of the two-volume casebook/treatise, Political and Civil Rights in the United States. Bender has argued more than 20 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and actively participates in constitutional litigation in federal and state courts.

Staci McCabe, Staci.McCabe">mailto:Staci.McCabe@asu.edu">Staci.McCabe@asu.edu
(480) 965-8702
Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law