Rock Art Center to offer guided tours in January


December 28, 2010

January is the perfect time in Arizona to get out and see the sights – and at the Deer Valley Rock Art Center, the sights include petroglyphs.

Deer Valley Rock Art Center will offer guided tours of the site’s more than 1,500 petroglyphs Saturdays, Jan. 8, 15, 22 and 29, from 10 to 11 a.m. each day. (DVRAC is closed Jan. 1.) Download Full Image

Visitors also will enjoy the scenery at DVRAC, which is a nature preserve, and informational exhibits in the museum.

The tour is included with regular admission. Tickets are $7 for adults, $4 for seniors and $3 for children over 5. Children 5 and younger are free. AAA members receive an additional 10 percent discount.

The Deer Valley Rock Art Center has the largest concentration of Native American petroglyphs in the Phoenix Valley. Visitors hike a 1/4-mile trail to view the petroglyphs, which were made between 500 and 7,000 years ago.

The museum aims to promote preservation, connection and respect for the site and is a destination for families to learn about archaeology in their own backyard. The center is managed by one of the top archaeology programs in the country – the School of Human Evolution & Social Change, an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences – at Arizona State University. DVRAC is a Phoenix Point of Pride.

The center is located at 3711 W. Deer Valley Road, two blocks west of 35th Avenue.

Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday to Saturday and 12 p.m.-5 p.m., on Sundays. For more information, call (623) 582-8007 or go to http://dvrac.asu.edu.">http://dvrac.asu.edu/">http://dvrac.asu.edu.

Panel to address rock-art vandalism


December 28, 2010

Some of Arizona’s greatest cultural resources are not easy to find, yet when vandals discover them, tragedy can occur.

A free panel discussion, “Painted, Scratched, Defaced: Rock Art Vandalism in Arizona,” at ASU’s Deer Valley Rock Art Center, Feb. 5, will address that topic. Download Full Image

The discussion will begin at 1 p.m. Panelists will include Neil Weintraub, Kaibab National Forest archaeologist; Peter Pilles, Coconino National Forest archaeologist; Lyle Balenquah, acting curator of anthropology, Museum of Northern Arizona; and Todd Bostwick, retired City of Phoenix archaeologist.

Vandalism to rock art sites in Arizona is a distressing and persistent reality. To promote public awareness and debate about the preservation of rock art sites, the panel will discuss a variety of topics, including recent vandalism at Keyhole Sink, debates over rock art conservation models, Native American concerns about the destruction of cultural heritage, as well as stewardship of archaeological sites.

Deer Valley Rock Art Center is located at 3711 W. Deer Valley Road, Phoenix. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday to Saturday and 12 p.m.-5 p.m. on Sundays.

DVRAC has the largest concentration of Native American petroglyphs in the Phoenix Valley. Visitors hike a 1/4-mile trail to view more 1,500 petroglyphs made between 500 and 7,000 years ago. The museum aims to promote preservation, connection and respect for the site and is a destination for families to learn about archaeology in their own backyard.

The center is managed by one of the top archaeology programs in the country – the School of Human Evolution & Social Change, an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences – at Arizona State University. It is a Phoenix Point of Pride.

For more information, call (623) 582-8007 or click http://dvrac.asu.edu/" target="_blank">here.