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Dedication to students' success earns engineering prof special honor


April 27, 2011

Varied and numerous contributions to teaching, research and public service throughout three decades at Arizona State University have earned James Collofello special recognition from his peers.

Collofello is the recent winner of the Daniel Jankowski Legacy Award in recognition of the value of his efforts to advance the mission of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.

As the engineering schools’ associate dean of academic and student affairs since 2006, he has helped lead implementation of several new and expanded programs to help students achieve success in and beyond the classroom.

Collofello and his team developed E2 Camp, a three-day orientation camp for incoming freshman engineering students, as well as programs that prepare undergraduates to work as teaching assistants, conduct research and learn to perform community service..

He’s also helped further ASU’s engineering education outreach to local high school students.

Previously, Collofello has been the associate chair and a longtime teacher in the computer science and engineering department.

He helped establish a computer science degree program at ASU, and has developed advanced models and methods for teaching computer science to students and working professionals.

He has done significant research in the information sciences field, primarily in computer software engineering.

In addition to duties as an associate dean, he coordinates the computer software engineering distance learning program.

Collofello has been instrumental in establishing relationships between the university and the software development industry. Those efforts have resulted in joint projects involving ASU and industry researchers.

He has developed industry training programs and served as a software engineering consultant to various companies.

“Jim is recognized and respected by our faculty, staff and students as a champion for student success, particularly by providing students opportunities to learn through hands-on experience and by developing innovative courses and programs,” says Paul Johnson, dean of the engineering schools. 

“He is an outstanding example of a higher education leader dedicated to giving students the best chance to fulfill their potential and reach their goals,” says engineering professor Joseph Palais, winner of the first  Jankowski Legacy Award.

The award was established in 2006 to honor Jankowski’s distinguished academic career, which spanned 40 years as a professor in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (now the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering). He retired in 2004.

During his career at ASU, he served six years as associate dean of academic affairs and a year as interim dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

The contributions honored by the award reflect Jankowski’s exemplary commitment to support of students, to high-quality instruction and development of programs aimed at fostering student achievement.

Previous winner Palais is a professor of electrical engineering and the graduate studies program chair in the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering.  He’s also academic director of online and professional   programs for the engineering school’s Global Outreach and Extended Education office.

The second Jankowski Award went to James Adams, a professor of materials science and engineering in the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy. Adams has guided the undergraduate materials science and engineering program for more than a decade.