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ASU's top academic programs keep climbing in world rankings

July 10, 2020

Editor’s note:  This story is being highlighted in ASU Now’s year in review. Read more top stories from 2020.

For years, Arizona State University has been recognized globally for its top-ranked academic programs, and 2020 is no different.

Shanghai Ranking released its annual Global Ranking of Academic Subjects on June 29, rating more than 4,000 universities across 54 subjects in natural sciences, engineering, life sciences, medical sciences and social sciences. ASU made some notable achievements, ranking significantly higher than in 2019 in at least five subjects, while ranking in the top 20 nationally in at least eight subjects.

In the W. P. Carey School of Business, ASU’s management program ranked fifth globally, up from seventh in 2019 — outranking Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Southern California. Business administration jumped from 26th to 16th place globally, while economics ranked 21st, up a few spots from the No. 25 position in 2019.

“We are thrilled our faculty’s scholarly research is being recognized as 21st in the world in economics, an increase of four places over last year, in addition to moving up two places to 5th in Management,” W. P. Carey Dean Amy Hillman said. "Overall, the W. P. Carey School of Business advanced 10 places since last year to 16th in the world. Our faculty research is at the highest tiers, and we’re grateful for the recognition.”

ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law is also celebrating higher global rankings in 2020, coming in at 15th — up from 23rd place in 2019, and besting other reputable institutions like Northwestern and Cornell.

“For ASU Law to move up a remarkable eight spots in just one year and achieve this prestigious honor as now the 15th top law school globally is incredible and a testament to the passion and innovation our students and faculty demonstrate each day,” ASU Law Dean Douglas Sylvester said. “Additionally, earlier this year we jumped three spots to become No. 24 in the U.S. News & World Report’s best law school rankings. It’s humbling to be recognized for our continued efforts to provide students the finest educational experience that helps them make an impact in their legal careers. My heartfelt congratulations to them and to our faculty and staff for their tremendous leadership.”

In the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, environmental science and engineering ranked 10th globally, a remarkable increase from the 39th spot in 2019, and outperformed Princeton, the University of Colorado at Boulder and Yale University.

“We are very proud of the recognition exemplified by the rise in rankings of our environmental engineering program,” said Ram Pendyala, director of the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. “Our award-winning faculty are engaged in cutting edge research and are renowned for their work in advancing public health, cleaning the environment and combating climate change. Their contributions to improving the human condition around the world are truly inspirational.”

READ MORE: School of Public Affairs' rankings for public administration research rise to No. 2 in nation, No. 4 in world

Shanghai Ranking used five criteria to rank thousands of universities across the globe, including the number of papers published in top journals and the number of faculty awards in the specific subjects. Below is a list of some of ASU’s best 2020 rankings based on subject.

Business administration

2020 world ranking: 16th

2020 national ranking: 14th

Economics

2020 world ranking: 21st

2020 national ranking: 17th

Education

2020 world ranking: 17th

2020 national ranking: 14th

Environmental science and engineering

2020 world ranking: 10th

2020 national ranking: Seventh

Geography

2020 world ranking: 24th

2020 national ranking: Fourth

Law

2020 world ranking: 15th

2020 national ranking: 15th

Management

2020 world ranking: Fifth

2020 national ranking: Third

Telecommunication engineering

2020 world ranking: 76th–100th

2020 national ranking: 10th–12th

Jimena Garrison

Copywriter , Media Relations and Strategic Communications

 
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ADHS, ASU announce partnership to increase COVID-19 testing in Arizona

Tests are by appointment only; schedule at azhealth.gov/testing.
July 9, 2020

ASU will launch program to provide free saliva-based diagnostic testing for up to 100,000 Arizonans

Editor’s note:  This story is being highlighted in ASU Now’s year in review. Read more top stories from 2020.

July 13 update: An additional date has been added: 7-11 a.m. Tuesday, July 14. Appointments can be made at the same link below, with the same agency code. Please check azhealth.gov/testing for future dates and times.

The Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) and Arizona State University announced a new partnership Thursday that will increase COVID-19 diagnostic testing in Arizona. ASU will launch several testing sites that will provide free saliva diagnostic testing for COVID-19 in high-need underserved communities around the state.

The tests are by appointment only, which can be scheduled by visiting azhealth.gov/testing. The first testing will take place on Saturday, July 11, from 8 a.m. to noon at Ak-Chin Pavilion, Gate 6, 2121 N. 83rd Ave. in Phoenix. Pre-register now by creating an account using the code SALIVATEST. Note that saliva testing is prohibited for those under the age of 8 years old.

Through this partnership, ADHS has committed up to $12.7 million to fund the expansion of testing sites to serve up to 100,000 Arizonans. ASU’s Biodesign Institute announced in May that it had developed the first saliva-based COVID-19 test in the state and has been utilizing saliva-based testing over the past six weeks to test critical workforce including health care workers, first responders and infrastructure personnel. ASU has also been using the saliva-based test with employees and students.

A collection tube for a COVID 19 saliva test

ASU’s Biodesign Institute developed the first saliva-based COVID-19 test in the state and over the past six weeks has used it to test critical workforce. In the coming week, it will begin testing the public. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

“This critical partnership will have an immediate impact in the fight against COVID-19 and help us surge testing where it’s needed most,” Gov. Doug Ducey said. “My thanks to Arizona State University for their continued partnership and for continuing to step up to aid public health in innovative and invaluable ways.”

“We are excited to partner with Arizona State University to launch this new testing program that will increase our capacity to test more people for COVID-19,” said Dr. Cara Christ, ADHS director. “Testing is an important public health tool to help us track COVID-19 and to implement mitigation strategies to slow the spread of the disease in Arizona, and over the last several months we have been working with partners across the state to increase COVID-19 testing. This includes providing funding for new testing equipment and distributing specimen collection kits to health care partners, laboratories and local health departments.”

“It is the university’s commitment to be of service to the citizens of the state of Arizona in any way we can as we all work together to deal with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “We are fortunate to have some extremely talented people at the university who have developed an innovative testing model, and it is our duty to share that expertise and put it to work to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

The new partnership with ASU will further increase the number of people who are getting a diagnostic COVID-19 test. ASU is working with ADHS on details related to future testing sites around the state. Since April, PCRPCR, or polymerase chain reaction, tests are used to detect the presence of an antigen. diagnostic testing has increased 596% from 52,866 tests in April to 367,992 tests in June. There have been 36,653 PCR tests reported in the first week of July.

Arizonans can take the following precautions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19:

  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Wear a mask every time you are in public, even if you do not feel sick. 
  • Physically distance by staying at least 6 feet away from others who are not in your household when you are in public. 
  • Avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. 
  • Arizonans at higher risk for severe illness should continue to stay at home and avoid crowded public spaces. People at higher risk for severe illness include adults 65 or older and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) and immediately throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Health care providers are offering testing at nearly 300 testing locations statewide. People are encouraged to follow the instructions on the testing website as many of the health care providers require individuals to pre-register for testing and may have other requirements to get tested. Testing locations along with appointment times and registration links can be found online at azhealth.gov/testing.

Top photo: Meghan Herrick (right) demonstrates giving Irene Mendoza instructions to fill the collection tube between a minimum and maximum level at one of seven ASU employee COVID-19 testing sites on Thursday. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 
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What is the difference between ASU Sync, iCourses and ASU Online?

July 9, 2020

We answer some questions about the new learning environment called ASU Sync

As ASU students prepare to head back to campus for the fall 2020 semester, we break down the details of the new learning environment called ASU Sync and how it is different from both iCourses and ASU Online.

ASU Sync and iCourses are offered to those enrolled as on-campus students. The easiest way to tell the difference is to look at the Location column in the course catalog, ASU Class Search. In-person classes (which ASU Sync is part of) will list a physical classroom; iCourses will have "iCourse" as their location.

ASU Online courses are most similar to iCourses in how they are delivered (entirely online). However, they are separate enrollment options using different course catalogs. On-campus students cannot take ASU Online courses, and ASU Online students cannot take iCourses (or in-person classes).

Learn more about each learning experience below.

ASU Sync

ASU Sync combines live Zoom lectures with in-the-classroom instruction. Students enrolled in in-person classes will attend classes both in person and via ASU Sync (Zoom). Sometimes students will need to attend class via ASU Sync for distancing reasons (keeping classrooms below a certain capacity), and other times students will utilize ASU Sync for health concerns or because they cannot be on campus due to travel restrictions.

The overwhelming majority of in-person courses will have an ASU Sync option (the exceptions are explained below); ASU Sync is already built-in, with no need to "opt in" for it. Students will access the ASU Sync option from their My ASU course list; the week before classes begin, each class listed under View My Schedule will have buttons next to them that allow students to launch a live ASU Sync session.

 Things to know about ASU Sync:

  • Every student in a class will participate in every class: Some will do so in person in the classroom; others will be participating in real time, via Zoom. 
  • To accommodate social distancing, professors will create a schedule for students on who attends in-person vs. remotely. For example, if you sign up for a Tuesday/Thursday class, your professor may assign you to come in person on Tuesdays and attend remotely on Thursdays. Professors will contact enrolled students in August to inform them how their specific class will be taught and managed.
  • Some classes (like performing arts or science labs) will be in-person only. For classes that will be offered in-person only, you will see a gray, "In-Person Only" tag to the right of the course name in your My ASU semester schedule. Additional instructions for students enrolled in classes that will meet in-person only can be found in the Special Notes section of the class details.
  • July 21 update: Some classes, primarily those with enrollment of 100 students or more, will only be via ASU Sync, without the in-person component. Those are labeled "ASU Sync Only" in the class list in My ASU.

MORE: Register for upcoming webinars or watch previous ones on the ASU Sync page

iCourses

These courses are designed to be taken entirely online, for the duration of the semester. They feature recorded lectures and other content, which students can watch and utilize on their own schedule. 

Over 2,400 iCourses are available. On-campus students can find and register for an iCourse by filtering by campus location in ASU Class Search. The link to the online coursework will be available via the class list on My ASU.

ASU Online

ASU Online is a separate enrollment system.

Things to know about ASU Online:

  • ASU Online classes are not ASU Sync classes or iCourses. They have different course catalogs.
  • ASU Online courses are 100% remote learning, as they always have been.
  • On-campus students cannot sign up for ASU Online courses.

More resources: 

 flow chart

See full-size, zoom-able PDF of the above graphic.

ASU's Hugh Downs School names new interim director


June 30, 2020

The Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University has named Paul Mongeau as interim director beginning July 1.

A professor at the school since 2002, Mongeau currently serves as associate director, a position he has held since 2013. Mongeau is also an ASU alumnus, having received his BS (1981) and his MA (1983) from the then Department of Communication.  Professor Paul Mongeau Download Full Image

Mongeau replaces Linda C. Lederman, a professor of health and human communication who has led the school since 2014.  Lederman previously served as dean of social sciences at The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at ASU. Lederman will take a year-long research leave and then continue teaching in August 2021.

READ MORE: ASU’s Hugh Downs School director to step down on July 1

Mongeau is a leading researcher in interpersonal and persuasive communication and has an acclaimed reputation, as is reflected in how frequently his work is cited and used by other scholars in communication and other disciplines.

“Professor Mongeau’s exceptional work in the field of human communication and his commitment to excellence at ASU position him to serve as an excellent leader for the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication,” said Pardis Mahdavi, dean of social sciences in The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “I look forward to collaborating with him during this exciting new chapter of the school.”

In his new appointment as interim director, Mongeau will continue to provide students and faculty with the tools to understand, analyze and respond to communication problems and opportunities, including interpersonal relationships, workplace teams, and community.

Earlier this year, Mongeau was presented the 2020 Distinguished Service Award from the Western States Communication Association at its annual conference in Denver. He was recognized for his numerous volunteer roles contributing to the success of the organization, including service as president from 2015–2016.   

Manager, Marketing and Communication, Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

480-965-5676

How ASU's policy and security office is reimagining IT culture


June 29, 2020

Editor's note: UTO Humble Heroes is a series featuring the people who make UTO run — their stories, in their own words. These exceptional team members solve problems, provide support and help students, staff and faculty at Arizona State University. 

Partnership, leadership and stakeholder empowerment is at the heart of ASU's University Technology Office governance, policy and information security teams' unique approach. These domain experts and cultural ambassadors cultivate effective information technology (IT) practices, drive security and enable innovation across the university. Members of the Governance, Policy and Information Security Team meeting virutally. Members of the governance, policy and information security teams meeting virtually. Download Full Image

'How can we do things better together?'

This question, posed by Tina Thorstenson, chief information security officer, reflects the culture of collaboration that drives her teams' work. Information technology touches every facet of ASU life and every member of the university community. In this complex and ever-changing environment, the governance, policy and information security teams are challenged to bolster technology alignment, information security, policy and acompliance — and to do so in a way that enables innovation.

“We have a responsibility to our ASU community — our ASU family — to keep them safe,” said Rebecca Hirschfeld, a system architect with the information security team, “and being part of the security office involves everything globally as well as within our campus community.”

These partnerships enable both proactive innovation and responsive adaptation. For example, in collaboration with EdPlus around ASU Open Scale — a learning pathway designed to expand access to higher education — this team helped provide the technical foundation for a new ASU initiative.

In response to COVID-19, ASU launched ASU for You, a collection of digital education resources available to all. With this project, the number of learners who needed a new digital identity to access ASU systems and resources skyrocketed. In partnership with EdPlus, this unit of the UTO developed a way to quickly create these identities and provide access to learners. Using an automated process, governance, policy and information security team members are able to keep up with demand, bringing on 50 to 100 new accounts per day. Since March 1, a total of 2,407 new identities have been created for EdPlus, including Open Scale and ASU for You.

The UTO governance, policy and security teams were also integral to the partnership between ASU and Air University, the U.S. Air Force’s eSchool for graduate professional military education.

“In order to get the partnership with Air University, we had to get certified by the Air Force to connect our systems to theirs, and we had to get a security certification,” said Tom Castellano, lead architect and senior director of cybersecurity strategy and assurance. “I'm most proud of getting that accomplished. It was really a team effort.”

According to an Air University press release, the partnership between ASU and Air University will “transform the distance learning experience for Air Force officers and civilians worldwide,” and is already serving 1,650 Air Force students. As with ASU Open Scale and ASU for You, GPIS was integral to developing the online identities for these students.

Strategic partnerships with vendors and industry leaders are also a key part of ASU’s efforts to proactively safeguard our community and seek out opportunities for innovation. For example, to bolster protections for the ASU community in this new remote modality, the Information Security Office collaborated with CrowdStrike to provide antivirus software for home use. This UTO team and the broader ASU community are also partnering with vendors around free training resources.

'Leadership is a critical part of GPIS'

Carolee Deuel, director of policy and compliance says her team enables information security and effective technology practices for all 34 decentralized units at ASU.

“We’re not about mandating,” Thorstenson said. “We develop partnerships and encourage everyone to be at their best.”

For example, the Information Security Office informs and collaborates with the Information Security Task Force, a team of senior leaders from across the university, to lead information security at ASU. This task force provides feedback and recommends new policies and standards. The decision to roll out two-factor authentication to all ASU staff, for example, was made through conversation with this task force.

“We're advisers,” Deuel said, “but the only way that we can be successful is if we're really good listeners, because people need to feel that we are there to help them not to dictate something that just makes their life harder.”

Thorstenson’s unique approach to governance, policy and information security centers around a holistic understanding of and commitment to ASU’s mission and culture.

“We align the university mission and goals with the technology needed to support those goals, and anticipate university needs,” Thorstenson said. “We strive to be stewards for better IT culture and communications across the university.” 

“Tina is an inspiration as a leader both within ASU, and across a male-dominated field like cybersecurity,” said Samantha Becker, UTO’s executive director of creative and communications. “I aspire to achieve the same level of expertise, agility and insight as Tina in my own field. Though there is an instant gravity that comes along with prioritizing safety and security, her positive and appreciative attitude adds to the cultural well-being of the UTO and ASU.”

As the deputy CIO for IT governance, policy and information security, Thorstenson leads with Positive Core culture, a deep respect for collaborators and a grounded optimism. Thorstenson guides her team in providing leadership beyond matters of technology or information security. 

“We work to ensure that ASU’s enterprise IT team (UTO) is a strategic partner with all ASU units,” Thorstenson said, “advancing 1) technology leadership across the ASU enterprise through strong connections ... 2) ASU's innovation through collaboration and cross-unit partnerships and 3) safety and protection by bringing visibility to potential IT risk.” 

This focus on culture and alignment enables the governance, policy and information security teams to rapidly pivot in the face of new threats or changing environments, including adapting to the complexities surrounding the COVID-19 virus. For example, when Brett Woods’ National Guard unit was activated to support the Arizona community, his colleagues on the information security team took on additional responsibilities and enabled Woods to support Arizona’s coronavirus response.

Stakeholder empowerment

A core way in which the governance, policy and information security teams demonstrate leadership and collaborative partnership is by educating and empowering the ASU community. 

“Stakeholder empowerment,” Castellano said, “is through focused engagements with a common growth-mindset approach to increase impact, drive success and develop teams.”

The GetProtected website offers curated security information and resources for the ASU community. Additionally, refreshed information security training is provided every year.

“We release a new version of that training every July, and the process is in the works right now to rewrite scripts and get that started,” said TJ Witucky, director of the security operations center.

By providing resources and tools, this team enables staff, faculty students and other stakeholders to better protect themselves and ASU. For example, the annual IT risk assessment enables stakeholders to better understand and mitigate the risks to their platforms and tools. Governance, policy and information security teams provide a survey to units across ASU, which illuminates the strengths and potential vulnerabilities in their systems.

“Stakeholder empowerment is crucial to the mission of the ASU Information Security Office,” Witucky said, “All ASU students, faculty, staff and affiliates must be empowered to secure any ASU information and assets under their control as ultimately, the security of the university is everyone’s responsibility.”

Another tool, the Executive IT Risk Review Dashboard, provides leaders across ASU with both high-level and detailed views of their unit’s systems, strengths and vulnerabilities.

“We're here to be your partner,” Hirschfeld said, “to help you resolve things by providing guidance to show you what needs to be fixed and how potentially you can fix it.” 

“Governance, policy and information security teams provide us with the most basic of human needs — safety and security,” said Christine Whitney Sanchez, UTO’s chief culture officer. “(Their) values-led approach and dedication to customer delight positions them as culture leaders within and beyond UTO, and enables them to better safeguard the community and enable innovation across ASU.” 

Featured UTO Humble Heroes: Tom Castellano, Richard Chappell, Donelle Culley, Carolee Deuel, Stephen Garcia, Alyssa Goldstein, Fred Hernandez, Michelle Hernandez, Rebecca Hirschfeld, Martin Idaszak, Robert Kamilli, Ahmed Khalil, David Lee, Darnell Loggins, Giovanna Lopez, Jeff Lords, Kevin Lough, Jason Pratt, Sean Reichert, Frank Rodriguez, Karen Tamayo, Tina Thorstenson, Jennifer Tweedy, Barnaby Wasson, Jeni White, TJ Witucky, Brett Woods and Melody Young.

Nominate a UTO Humble Hero.

Laura Geringer

Content strategist and ShapingEDU community manager, University Technology Office

ASU Enterprise Partners named top employer for 7th year


June 29, 2020

ASU Enterprise Partners earned high marks as an employer for 2019, making it a Top Company to Work for in Arizona for the seventh consecutive year.

The nonprofit organization raises resources on behalf of Arizona State University and was one of 120 employers selected for the award presented by Republic Media and the Arizona Commerce Authority. Companies with at least 25 employees are evaluated through surveys to employers and employees regarding leadership, culture, communication, job satisfaction, work environment, training and development, pay and benefits and engagement. The firms are ranked based on their composite scores in each area. three people holding sign that says "We did it!" ASU Enterprise Partners employees celebrate Sun Devil Giving Day. Download Full Image

“We are thrilled to again be recognized as a Top Company to Work for in Arizona,” ASU Enterprise Partners CEO Dan Dillion said. “We pride ourselves on having a culture that is focused on serving, engaging, innovating and caring for ASU, our community and our employees.”

ASU Enterprise Partners operates under the philosophy that its success comes from ensuring its employees are happy, healthy and successful in all aspects of life, he said.

That includes a culture of caring, family-friendly benefits and a host of offerings for health and wellness and personal and professional development. Employees have the opportunity to enjoy complimentary on-site yoga during lunch and participate in periodic health assessments. Employees also receive complimentary personal finance tools and a paid day off for their birthdays. 

“The organization provides unique staff events, including all-staff movies, bring your kid to work day, gingerbread house decorating contests and motivational speakers,” said Cheryl Shumate, vice president of human resources. “We recognize that people spend a lot of time at work and want to provide a place that is fulfilling and fun. That’s why we hold so many events focused on engagement, appreciation and wellness.”

Professionally, employees complete DISC assessments when they are hired to learn about their communication style and how they respond to conflict and stress to improve communications with colleagues who may have a different style. Employees also have access to mentorships that may lead to a future career path within the organization or supplement their understanding of other departments in their current roles.

“Our employees are our greatest asset and we want to provide them an enriching work environment to help them grow personally and professionally,” Dillon said.

Michelle Stermole

Director of communications, Enterprise Partners

480-727-7402

ASU Enterprise Partners awarded for trailblazing technology use


June 25, 2020

ASU Enterprise Partners was awarded the Dave Perry Excellence in Innovation Award by Salesforce.org for being a trailblazer that uses technology in an unconventional way to enhance the donor experience.

ASU Enterprise Partners, parent organization to the ASU Foundation for a New American University, was recognized for implementing Salesforce’s Commerce Cloud e-commerce technology on the ASU Foundation website. The award was announced virtually during Salesforce’s eighth annual Higher Education Summit. The Dave Perry Excellence in Innovation Award recognizes a college or university that uses Salesforce to advance recruiting, student success, advancement, marketing or engagement. It is named after a Salesforce employee who was integral in higher education data architecture and passed away in 2017. ASU Foundation website screenshot of donor funds available The ASU Foundation website features an e-commerce platform for an enhanced donor experience. Download Full Image

“What was innovative is we’re the first higher education nonprofit to implement the Commerce Cloud for online giving,” said Zach Lisi, director of solutions development for ASU Enterprise Partners and an integral part of the multidisciplinary team that implemented Commerce Cloud. “The old platform was very basic. We wanted to give donors the ability to go to the ASU Foundation website and do research, look up funds, learn about those funds and see the impact of how they affect students directly.”

Not only was the nonprofit the first to use a platform that is commonly used among online retailers, but the implementation team transitioned the ASU Foundation giving experience on a very aggressive timeline.

ASU Enterprise Partners worked with a seasoned partner to implement the platform and was told such implementations typically take a year, but some companies have implemented Commerce Cloud in six months, Lisi said.

ASU Enterprise Partners implemented the platform in just 12 weeks.        

“They were very skeptical. We made it happen,” Lisi said.

Other ASU Enterprise Partners implementation team members included Melissa Bordow, Jana Brown, Andrew Carey, Anna Consie, Jorge De Cossio, Chris Dizon, Carey Fredlake, Melissa Kwilosz, Liz Levenson, Gabe Martinez, Lauren Mitchell, Blake Pappas, Erin Sherman, Debbie Williams and Serah Ye.

Commerce Cloud enables donors to search by cause instead of fund name, similar to how a consumer searches for an article of clothing from their favorite online retailers.

The e-commerce experience allows each of the nearly 600 fund pages to provide a visual representation of the fund through videos and photos, stories about what the fund is intended to do and the impact the donor can make through the fund, said Fredlake, director of strategic outreach for ASU Enterprise Partners.

If a donor is interested in funds related to COVID-19 research, they can search for that interest and learn more about funds focused on that cause, Lisi said.

“People aren’t necessarily donating to a school they are an alumni of,” he said. “People want to give money to things they’re passionate about.”

Commerce Cloud reduced the time it takes a donor to donate and the additional visuals and information led to a 25% increase in gift amount, Fredlake said, adding that there has also been an increase in conversion rates compared to nonprofit industry benchmarks.

ASU Enterprise Partners has used the Salesforce customer relationship management platform for a few years and recently added Salesforce’s gift processing tools.

“We’re just starting the journey of what this can turn into,” Lisi said of the potential for the Commerce Cloud platform in the future.

It could become a donor portal to see giving history and provide endowed scholarship reports and donation tax documents, he said, adding that it could also be used to sign up people for volunteer and mentor opportunities at ASU.

The foundation can provide a more targeted and personalized experience to donors between Commerce Cloud and Salesforce’s Marketing Cloud.

“Commerce Cloud is a robust tool in our toolbox, which has provided a streamlined, storytelling focused donation experience,” Fredlake said. “It has become a natural extension to the stories shared through our donor journeys.”

Other higher education foundations have reached out to ASU Enterprise Partners to learn more about the possibilities because of its success, Lisi said.

“It was a big effort, it was a big team, it took a lot of resources and dedication,” he said. “We should all be very proud of what we accomplished.”

Michelle Stermole

Director of communications, Enterprise Partners

480-727-7402

 
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ASU at Lake Havasu names new director

June 23, 2020

Oregonian Carla J. Harcleroad will helm new post on July 1 but has already been getting to know the community since April

When ASU at Lake Havasu Director Raymond Van der Riet leaves his post next month, his big shoes will be filled quickly and seamlessly.

Carla J. Harcleroad has been named the Arizona State University location’s new director and will start her position July 1.

“Carla brings a wealth of leadership, academic and professional experiences to this position,” said Mark Searle, ASU executive vice president and university provost. “I am confident she will be a strong leader for ASU at Lake Havasu, leading it to a bright future.”

Harcleroad has been at the location since April. She came early to get acquainted with the job, shadowing Van der Riet and, according to her, “working to facilitate a seamless transition even amid COVID-19.”

The Oregon native was a former associate vice president at Portland State University in Oregon before arriving at ASU. Prior to that, she worked at the University of Oregon as well as Lewis and Clark College in Portland.

ASU Now spoke with Harcleroad as she prepared to take the helm in Havasu.

Question: What is your educational and professional background?

Answer: I’ve held numerous leadership, research and teaching roles in the past 17 years, including the Educational Policy Improvement Center in Eugene, Oregon; the University of Oregon; Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon; and Portland State University. Across all of these professional roles, I have been most inspired by efforts that seek to increase student success. I’ve developed expertise in organizational change, college student retention and college student academic and career advising. I earned a PhD in educational leadership–policy, management and organization from the University of Oregon, an MA in higher educational and organizational change from UCLA, an MS in educational leadership–higher education administration from the University of Oregon, and a BA in English and applied linguistics from Portland State University.

Q: Why did you choose to lead ASU at Lake Havasu?

A: I’m excited to support students, faculty and professional staff to achieve new and continued success at a location with strong and meaningful connections to the broader community. The hands-on learning experiences students engage in through partnerships between the campus and Lake Havasu City provide unique, service-based learning opportunities, and I wanted to be a part of this great work. I’m also very excited to live in a smaller city with exceptional access to outdoor recreation. My husband and I love the sunshine and the water!

Q: When not at the office, what are your favorite hobbies?

A: In my free time, you will find me with family and friends, caring for my rescued bullmastiff, Joey — who has special needs — reading, and spending as much time as possible outside enjoying water-focused and sun-filled activities.

Q: What are your office must-haves?

A: Beyond the basics, in my office at work, I like sit-stand workstations. The ability to stand up during the day increases my productivity and contributes to my well-being. I also like plants. I think plant life in office settings helps create a welcoming environment.

Q: How has it been taking on a new job in a new location in the middle of a pandemic?

A: (It) has been challenging, interesting, stressful, creative and growth-full. It’s required patience and exceptionally creative problem solving, and while it’s been challenging, it’s also been so special to receive such a warm reception from my colleagues at ASU at Lake Havasu, the broader ASU community and Lake Havasu City. People have extended their advice, their help, their care and their kindness. While the pandemic is tragic and full of loss, starting a new job at this time has also given me the opportunity to see that my new colleagues and friends are community-focused. It’s truly an honor and privilege to be here in this new professional role, and I’m grateful to be a part of this very special Lake Havasu City community. Even though I’ve only been here for [a short time], I already feel a deep appreciation for the city and for the people.

Q: Had you been to Lake Havasu City before this transition?

A: While growing up in Oregon, my grandparents lived in Tucson, and we had the opportunity to visit often. As an adult, I continued to visit them in the summer — so I have been in Arizona when it’s hot — and I knew that I wanted to live in this state at some point. I haven’t had the opportunity to spend time in Lake Havasu City prior to visiting in March, but I instantly fell in love with the city and community. What’s not to love? It’s warm, it’s in Arizona and it hosts a beautiful lake!

Reporter , ASU News

480-727-5176

Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics moves to the humanities, appoints new director


June 22, 2020

The Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics at Arizona State University was founded on the belief that ethical behavior can create better and more positive outcomes in every facet of life. Now, more than 20 years after the center was first established, this mission is being reinvigorated with an official move to the humanities and a new director.

In July, Elizabeth Langland will take on the role of director of the center. Langland has been with ASU since 2007, serving as vice provost of the West campus and dean of the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. Since then, Langland has served in several other roles at ASU, including interim dean of humanities at The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and, most recently, as director of the Institute for Humanities Research.  Elizabeth Langland has been appointed the new director of the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics. Download Full Image

“This move marks the next chapter for the Lincoln Center and The College,” said Jeffrey Cohen, dean of the humanities. “Applied ethics in their relation to technology and innovation have never been more urgent, and this emphasis enables the center to fulfill founding vision of the Lincoln family. As we embark on this transition, I am confident that with Elizabeth’s outstanding leadership there will be many exciting collaborations and projects to come.”

Langland specializes in Victorian British literature, particularly in theory of the novel and feminist criticism. She has authored four books and dozens of articles and has edited or co-edited five books on these topics.

After working at other universities, Langland said she was drawn to ASU for the university’s unique emphasis on interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary study and collaboration. She said she sees ethics as an essential foundation for any discipline and hopes this move will encourage more cross-discipline collaboration moving forward.

“This is a way of really creating significant synergies with what other centers and departments are doing, because ethics truly is just a part of every aspect of our lives,” Langland said. “If you're studying business, it's important to think about what ethical practices are and why you want to institute ethical practices in business. If you're studying medicine, obviously we want to behave ethically toward patients. If we're thinking about engineering, we want to make sure bridges don't collapse and that buildings don't fall apart. All of these are critical issues to think about instead of just making profit.”

In addition to encouraging collaboration, the center will have a new focus on ethical innovation and humane technologies. With this new focus, Langland also hopes to collaborate beyond the university with innovators in the field of technology to inform ethically based innovation.

“We're depending so much on technology. It’s done so many wonderful things for us, but at the same time, people have major concerns about the effects of technology on our life,” Langland said. “Our challenge in the coming years is to ensure that innovation is ethically based. As No. 1 in innovation, let's make that innovation ethically based.”

Emily Balli

Communications Specialist and Lead Writer, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

ASU writing center wins prestigious grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

The Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing to present over 25 events showcasing indigenous arts and culture programming as part of NEA Big Read in spring 2021


June 16, 2020

The Virginia G. Piper CenterThe Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University is nonacademic university center dedicated to offering classes, talks, readings, workshops and other literary events and programs for the larger community. for Creative Writing at Arizona State University has been awarded a prestigious Big Read Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to present a month of talks, readings, book clubs and other dynamic events and programs around indigenous culture and the literary arts in spring 2021.

"For over 16 years, the Piper Center has been a catalyst for connecting area arts and culture organizations and serving communities through innovative, inspiring and accessible collaborative programs," said Alberto Ríos, inaugural Arizona Poet Laureate and center director. "With an extensive network of valued partners within Arizona State University and throughout the state, the Piper Center has the structure and community investments needed to deliver a deeply meaningful and transformative experience through the NEA Big Read." person reading book Photo courtesy of Pixabay. Download Full Image

A page-turning masterpiece of literary fiction

The NEA Big ReadThe Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University is one of 78 not-for-profit organizations to receive a grant to host an NEA Big Read project between September 2019 and June 2020.: Phoenix is centered around "The Round House" by Louise Erdrich (Anishinaabe). Winner of the National Book Award in fiction for 2012, the novel is a classic coming-of age story blended with elements of memoir, detective novels and oral history that, according to the NEA, "tells the suspenseful tale of a 13-year-old boy's investigation and desire for revenge following a brutal attack on his mother that leaves his father, a tribal judge, helpless in his pursuit to bring the perpetrator to justice.”

Exploring justice, family and personal history through an indigenous lens, the Piper Center is organizing a dynamic and extensive lineup of interconnected performances, workshops and conversations with university partners and other organizations from the larger community.

New work from acclaimed poet 

For the keynote event, acclaimed poet Layli Long Soldier (Ogala Lakota) will develop and present new work commissioned by the grant in a reading and conversation moderated by poet, MacArthur Fellow and ASU Professor Natalie Diaz.

Long Soldier has a deep history of social activism and has received numerous recognitions and awards for her work, including a Lannan Literary Fellowship, a Whiting Award and a National Book Critics Circle award. Her debut collection, "Whereas," uses the language and occasion of President Obama's 2009 congressional apology to Native Americans to challenge, as described by Diaz, "the making and maintenance of an empire ... transforming the page to withstand the tension of an occupied body, country and, specifically, an occupied language."

Logo for NEA Big Read

Over 25 panels, workshops and performances

Beyond the keynote, the NEA Big Read: Phoenix will feature a variety of programs spanning poetry, storytelling, library science, the humanities and more, including:

  • Diné poetry reading: A reading and panel of Diné poets curated by poet and Diné College Professor Jake Skeets (Diné), winner of the 2020 Whiting Award and the 2019 National Poetry Series.
  • Oral history and family archive workshops: A series of oral history and family archive workshops with the Labriola National American Indian Data Center and local poet Amber McCrary (Diné).
  • Storytelling event: A storytelling event curated by Liz Warren of South Mountain Community College.
  • Political action: A panel reconvening members of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Committee (HB 2570) with Arizona House representative Jennifer Jermaine.
  • Land recognition: A panel on the ethics, politics and craft of land recognitions with ASU professors and staff, with David Martinez (Akimel O'odham/Hia Ced O'odham), Felicia Mitchell (Chickasaw) and Alex Soto (Tohono O'odham).
  • Literary salons: A literary salon on decolonization with Associate Professor Amanda Tachine (Diné).
  • Book clubs: Numerous book clubs and reading groups with Burton Barr Central Library.

While many events focus on or are intended for indigenous individuals, all events are open to the public. With a few exceptions, the majority are free.

To share "The Round House" throughout the community, the Piper Center will be distributing over 750 books to the public for free. Community members will also be able to check out unlimited copies of the e-book for three months through the Phoenix Public Library.

Addressing a critical national and local issue

Within "The Round House's" larger themes, the Piper Center will place a particular focus on the issues that form the central conflict of the novel: missing and murdered indigenous women and girls (MMIWG).

"Violence against Native women and girls exceeds that of any other group in the United States," said Traci Morris, who directs the American Indian Policy Institute at Arizona State University. "While Native women make up less than 2% of the national population, nearly 40% of all women involved in sex trafficking cases are indigenous."

Several efforts have taken steps to address this problem over the last year. The Arizona Legislature formed a local task force to study MMIWG through HB2570 in May 2019. A similar committee was established by an executive order from Donald Trump that November.

Unfortunately, a lack of reliable data and standardized collection practices among local, state, federal and tribal governments make it virtually impossible to assess the extent of the issue, let alone address it.

"Native women in Arizona disappear three times when they go missing: they disappear in real life, they disappear in the data and they disappear in the media," said state representative Jennifer Jermaine. "With HB2570 we are examining the systematic gaps in data collection and resource allocation from the state level. We are also partnering with tribal leaders and federal agencies to begin to solve communication and coordination problems that have complicated search, rescue and recovery efforts."

Similarly, the American Indian Policy Institute recently received a grant from the Media Democracy Fund to analyze crime reporting flows, algorithmic bias and other complex systems around collecting information. With improved data sets and reporting practices, governments will be able to create more effective policies and legislation.

At the same time, statistics alone can't provide the political, social and historical context in which these crimes take place, nor can they capture the experiences of individuals, families and communities who are forced to live through it. Most importantly of all, these issues risk reducing their identities to that of mere victims, simplifying a rich and dynamic humanity.

Through this grant, the center aims to extend and deepen the discourse around indigenous perspectives, raise awareness and activism surrounding missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, and honor the lives and stories of Native American storytellers, artists and community members.

“With its NEA Big Read programs structured around the work of indigenous women and social justice, the Piper Center has once again demonstrated its commitment to embodying the mission of The College," said Jeffrey Cohen, dean of humanities at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University. "The future of the humanities is here.” 

More information about the NEA Big Read: Phoenix

Jake Friedman

Coordinator, Virginia G. Piper for Creative Writing

480-965-6018

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