ASU Graduate College recognizes research at 2021 Knowledge Mobilization Awards


April 13, 2021

The ASU Graduate College has announced the awardees of the fifth annual Graduate College Knowledge Mobilization Awards. The daylong virtual event featured four graduate student and postdoctoral scholar finalist sessions, a faculty panel and the awards presentation, which featured a keynote address by Ronald Beghetto of ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.

The Knowledge Mobilization Awards are an annual event celebrating the innovation and ingenuity of Arizona State University's graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. Sponsored by the Knowledge Mobilization Initiative at the Graduate College, the initiative helps researchers move academic knowledge beyond the university to put it into use — in current practice, informing policy change and collaborating with industry and/or community-based organizations. Graduate College Knowledge Mobilization Awards Pictured clockwise: Awardees Anais Roque, Amanda Trakas, Shawna Andrea Foo, Barbara Quimby and Noa Bruhis. Download Full Image

The 2021 pool of applications was historically large, including 116 applications from 23 academic units and over 70 programs. Applications were evaluated by an interdisciplinary review panel using the following criteria: 

  • Clearly poses a research question or hypothesis in plain and persuasive language.

  • Identifies the broader social impact of the research, including whom it may benefit and how it can tangibly impact that community (for example, through a change in practice or creation of new policy).

  • An example knowledge mobilization product, or an artifact (presentation, poster, article, white paper, art exhibit, etc.) that demonstrates how this research engages with relevant stakeholders.

For this year’s virtual event, finalists showcased their research projects in small, informal round table sessions, discussing their experiences as early career researchers and answering questions from the audience. Six awardees were selected from the 18 finalists.

2021 Knowledge Mobilization Award winners

  • Amanda Trakas, The Design School, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. 
    Master’s Research in Progress ($500.00): “KIDSS: Considering Kids in Design of Safe Streets.”

  • Cameo Flores, School of Music, Dance and Theatre, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. 
    Master’s Completed Research ($500.00): “Weaponizing the Mariachi 2015–Today: Mexicanidad and the Trump Administration.”

  • Noa Bruhis, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, College of Global Futures. 
    Doctoral Research in Progress ($750.00): “Helium rising: A case study on envisioning futures for underground resource extraction.”

  • Anais Roque, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
    Doctoral Completed Research ($750.00): “Water Sharing as Disaster Response in Puerto Rico: Coping with Water Insecurity in the Aftermath of Hurricane María.”

  • Barbara Quimby, Morrison Institute of Public Policy.
    Postdoctoral Research in Progress ($1,000.00): “Water for Agriculture: Stakeholder Engagement in the Verde Valley, Arizona.”

  • Shawna Andrea Foo, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science.
    Postdoctoral Completed Research: ($1,000.00): “Drivers of fish populations in Hawaii Island.”

“We are incredibly pleased to see that students and postdocs from so many academic programs participated in this year’s Knowledge Mobilization Awards,” said Elizabeth Wentz, vice provost and dean of the Graduate College. "Knowledge mobilization is a research framework that calls for the discovery of public value through use-inspired research in order to transform society. It speaks directly to the ASU Charter and design principles. The fact that so many members of our research community see its value means that ASU will be well-prepared for the future of research.”

The beautiful risk of action-forward research

A panel of faculty experts discussed their professional experiences conducting applied and socially impactful research, as well as the need to use knowledge mobilization as a framework for graduate research that is action-forward. The panel included Gustavo Fischman from the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College; Flavio Marsiglia and Laurie Mook from the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions; Vice Provost and Dean Elizabeth Wentz and Associate Dean Enrique Vivoni of the Graduate College.

The event concluded with a keynote address from Ronald Beghetto of ASU’s Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. In a talk titled “The Beautiful Risk of Action-Forward Research,” Beghetto discussed the benefits of approaching research creatively, working through uncertainty, and finding opportunities to continually reflect and learn

Following his address, the six awardees were announced.

The full list of awardees and finalists for each category are:  

Master's Research in Progress

  • Winner: Amanda Trakas, The Design School, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. 
    "KIDSS: Considering Kids in Design of Safe Streets."

  • Alli St. John, School of Music, Dance and Theatre, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. 
    "Consent and Staged Intimacy in High School Theatre Programs."

  • Jeff Tabet, School of Justice and Human Rights, New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. 
    "Choose Awareness."

Master's Completed Research 

  • Winner: Cameo Flores, School of Music, Dance and Theatre, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. 
    "Weaponizing the Mariachi 2015–Today: Mexicanidad and the Trump Administration."

  • Akshay Kumar Dileep, School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision System Engineering, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering.
    "Early Detection of At-Risk Students in a Calculus Course."

  • Tareq Al-Ahdal, College of Health Solutions. 
    "The impact of climate change on diarrheal diseases in Jordan in the period between 2004–2018."

Doctoral Research in Progress 

  • Winner: Noa Bruhis, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, College of Global Futures. 
    "Helium rising: A case study on envisioning futures for underground resource extraction."

  • Lushanya Echeverria, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. 
    "Dialogical Narrative Analysis as a Responsive Approach to Compassion Fatigue Reduction in Teachers."

  • Man Luo, School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering.
    "Semantic Information Retrieval in Biomedical Domain."

Doctoral Completed Research

  • Winner: Anais Roque, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
    "Water Sharing as Disaster Response in Puerto Rico: Coping with Water Insecurity in the Aftermath of Hurricane María."

  • Gabrielle Lout, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, College of Global Futures.
    "Descent work in the Caribbean: Sub-regional assessment of the shrimp and groundfish fisheries in Guyana, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago."

  • Marzieh Bitaab, School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering.
    "Detecting Scam Websites at Scale."

Postdoctoral Research in Progress

  • Winner: Barbara Quimby, Kyl Center for Water Policy, Morris Institute. 
    "Water for Agriculture: Stakeholder Engagement in the Verde Valley, Arizona."

  • Lauren van Huisstede, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.
    "Developing a Graduate Student Workshop Series in Data Management Best Practices."

  • Stefania Kapsetaki, Biodesign Center for Biocomputing, Security and Society.
    "Disease in spacetime: 1460 species approaching the T(r)opic of Cancer at the top of the food pyramid."

Postdoctoral Completed Research 

  • Winner: Shawna Andrea Foo, Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science.
    "Drivers of fish populations in Hawaii Island."

  • Emily Springer, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences.
    "Dumb Numbers: How international development evaluation undermines gender justice."

  • Annabelle Atkin, T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics.
    "Understanding Familial Support of Multiracial Youths' Experiences."

Tracy Viselli

Director of Communications and Marketing, Graduate College

480-727-0769

In memoriam: Associate Research Professional Paul Liddell


April 13, 2021

Arizona State University employs many unsung heroes, like Paul Liddell, who devote their lives and careers not only to research, but to helping others. Liddell, an associate research professional in the School of Molecular Sciences, died in late February.

Liddell, a native of New Zealand, came to ASU for his graduate work in chemistry in the early 1980s, initially working with George Pettit. Later, in 1986, under the direction of Devens Gust, Liddell earned his PhD as a synthetic organic chemist specializing in photosynthetic systems with an emphasis on porphyrins and carotenoids, key photosynthetic compounds. Liddell was hired by the ASU Center for Early Events in Photosynthesis, where he continued to work with Gust, the Moore research group and many other researchers who sought out his expertise in synthetic chemistry. Paul Liddel's lab. Download Full Image

Throughout his career, Liddell contributed to many important scientific discoveries. He designed and prepared extremely complex multi-component molecules containing several chromophores, electron donors and/or acceptors, and photochromic switching units. These molecular constructs included artificial reaction centers that absorb light and store the resulting energy, and molecular antennas that can trap light and make it available for conversion to electrochemical energy.

“Paul was a synthetic powerhouse," Gust said. "His molecular preparations were studied by spectroscopists and electrochemists at ASU and in collaborating laboratories around the world.”

Among the many molecules prepared by Liddell were some that were examined collaboratively at ASU and Oxford University, which helped uncover the hitherto unknown mechanisms by which birds navigate using Earth’s magnetic field. While at ASU, Liddell coauthored approximately 100 publications, including several in Nature and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences¸ and many in the Journal of the American Chemical Society

Throughout his career, Liddell willingly shared his expertise with others, mentoring a steady stream of undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral associates in synthetic chemistry.

Postdoctoral associates who worked closely with Liddell observed, “He was always willing to help us with difficult procedures or designing synthetic alternatives related to our projects. He was always sharing his experiences as well as encouraging us with valuable discussions and kind words.”

“Paul Liddell showed me how chemists conduct themselves safely in laboratories," said John Crozier, ASU senior compliance officer. "I learned from Paul much about health and safety, particularly as it pertained to handling high risk chemicals.”

Ian Gould, interim director of the School of Molecular Sciences, observed that Liddell was very much appreciated as a colleague who was very friendly and generous with his time and expertise.

“Paul will be remembered not just for his hard work and outstanding scientific contributions, but as a kind, gentle and much-liked person who in his own low-profile way contributed much to the culture and scientific reputation to the School of Molecular Sciences," Gould said.

"Paul Liddell was a loyal and generous friend to his coworkers and at the same time was intensely private. The image of Paul’s busy lab in this article will be familiar to everyone who knew him and his work. Paul was a cherished member of the SMS family, and our friend; we will miss his companionship and invaluable expertise."
James Klemaszewski

Science writer, School of Molecular Sciences

480-965-2729