English alumnus wins Lambda literary award


June 19, 2009

Bill Konigsberg, who earned an MFA in Creative Writing from ASU in 2005, is the recipient of the 21st Annual Lambda Literary Award in LGBT in the children/young adult fiction category. Konigsberg, a sports writer and editor for the Associated Press, earned the national recognition for his 2008 book, "Out of the Pocket," which was published by Penguin/Dutton.

The Lambda Literary Foundation, the nation's leading organization serving LGBT writers and readers, recognizes works in more than 20 categories of literature, including LGBT anthology, lesbian/gay memoir/biography, LGBT sci-fi/fantasy/horror, transgender fiction, and lesbian/gay poetry. More than 100 writers from across the United States were nominated for this year's Lambda Literary Awards. Download Full Image

"Out of the Pocket" is the story of Bobby Framingham, a star high school quarterback whose life changes dramatically as he grapples and eventually comes to terms with his sexuality and identity.

Konigsberg, an alumnus of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department of English, visited ASU in fall 2008 and spoke about his new book as part of the annual "Come Home to English" homecoming events. The visit was coordinated by Konigsberg's friend and mentor, Jim Blasingame, ASU associate professor of English education and 2008 Parents Association Professor of the Year.

Ginger Hanson, Ginger.Hanson">mailto:Ginger.Hanson@asu.edu">Ginger.Hanson@asu.edu
480-965-7611
Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

English’s Lockard receives Filson Fellowship


June 19, 2009

Joe Lockard, ASU associate professor of English, is the recipient of a Filson Historical Society Fellowship that will fund a portion of his research on the early life of Kentucky-born author Mattie Griffith. Located in Louisville, the Filson Society is the leading historical society in Kentucky.

Griffith came of age in a slave-holding family during the mid-19th century, but her early experiences predisposed her against slavery and she became a strong abolitionist. Griffith wrote several anti-slavery texts including "Autobiography of a Female Slave" (1857), a pseudo-slave narrative depicting a woman's life under slavery. Griffith stated that the controversial "Autobiography" was composed of actual events she witnessed. Eventually she left to relocate in the North, at first in Pennsylvania and later Massachusetts. With financial assistance from the American Anti-Slavery Society, Griffith was able to emancipate her family's slaves. Download Full Image

Lockard's previous research reconstructed many facts of Griffith's later life as an author and reformer, historical work first published by the University Press of Mississippi as an afterword to its edition of the "Autobiography." However, there has been no opportunity to explore her earlier years in Owensboro and Louisville. Lockard intends to unearth missing pieces of her past so that this anti-slavery storyteller's own life story can be contextualized in antebellum Kentucky.

Ginger Hanson, Ginger.Hanson">mailto:Ginger.Hanson@asu.edu">Ginger.Hanson@asu.edu
480-965-7611
Department of English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences