No-notice deployment, two moves and a marriage: ASU Online grad did it all while pursuing degree


December 7, 2020

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable fall 2020 graduates.

Iiae Braham always loved school and learning new things. So it’s no surprise she began her studies at 17 at a local community college in her hometown of Lincoln, Illinois. While a psychology degree was her main goal initially, after taking a sociology course taught by an amazing professor, Braham knew her path. And this month, she will be graduating with a degree in sociology and a minor in organizational leadership from Arizona State University. ASU Online student, 2020 graduate Iiae Hess Download Full Image

While taking classes back in her hometown, finances proved difficult, so Braham joined the U.S. Air Force to help pay for her degree. It was joining the Air Force that also introduced her to ASU. Braham was stationed in Arizona for the first five years of her Air Force career. Although there were other options for her in and around Tucson, ASU’s military-friendly reputation ultimately helped her land at ASU Online and while learning more about herself in the Air Force, she became interested in leadership roles, which led to her decision to add a minor in organizational leadership. 

As an online student, she did the majority of her coursework in the comfort of her home at the kitchen table around her work schedule, but that’s not always where deep thinking happened. “Most of my reflection about life or the material I was reading would happen on long walks outside.”

As graduation day approaches, Braham loves the recognition that comes with saying "I pursued a degree with ASU," and enjoys sharing that experience and knowledge with others who may be interested in pursuing a degree but don’t know where to begin. In fact, Braham has also inspired her husband to pursue a degree at ASU. “Getting to say we are a Sun Devil power couple makes me so happy,” she said. 

Aside from graduating summa cum laude, Braham has decided to continue her educational career with a master’s degree in management and leadership she will start next year. For those still pursuing a degree, Braham believes, “The important thing is to never give up, take what life throws at you and do the best that you can and eventually that degree will be in hand and all the bumps along the way will have been worth it!”

Question: What’s something you learned while at ASU — in the classroom or otherwise — that surprised you or changed your perspective?

Answer: There have been so many things I’ve learned here! Realizing that everything must be evaluated in the context or culture it is found in, rather than our perspectives has changed a lot of my beliefs and judgements and made me a more understanding person. Learning about the facets of leadership has really changed how I operate at work and made me a better leader as well.

Q: Which professor taught you the most important lesson while at ASU?

A: Definitely Dr. Carlsen-Landy. I took a sociology course with her then ended up being her TA for two additional courses. I learned that attention to detail matters, academically and in real life. Her course was challenging but really made me sit down and focus on my coursework and what I was reading.

Q: What’s the best piece of advice you’d give to those still in school?

A: Remember your “why." It gets hard and stressful but remember WHY you are pursuing the degree you are pursuing and remind yourself that you’ll only get there if you put in the work.

Q: What are your plans after graduation?

A: I have already been accepted to a master’s program for management and leadership that I will begin next year. After graduation, I will be packing up the house and waiting for my husband to return from South Korea so we can move across the country to our new base in South Carolina.

Q: If someone gave you $40 million to solve one problem on our planet, what would you tackle?

A: That’s a tough one! Although I don’t think $40 million would be enough to solve a problem, I think it would help fund some of the change that needs to happen with racial inequality. The money could be used in a number of ways, however I think targeting a few major cities and restructuring the law enforcement system would help spur change across the county. Bringing in a force of not just police officers, but mental health professionals, social workers, health care workers, etc. to respond to calls with the appropriate agency. Taking this big step would show that this country is taking steps towards changing for the better, and taking the problems of racial inequality and injustice seriously.

Written by Tuesday Mahrle, earned media specialist for EdPlus at Arizona State University

ASU faculty, students receive top honors at national communication conference


December 7, 2020

ASU faculty and graduate students in Arizona State University's Hugh Downs School of Human Communication received numerous awards and recognition at the National Communication Association (NCA) 106th annual convention, held virtually Nov. 19–22 due to the pandemic.

Hugh Downs School Professor Sarah Tracy received the Distinguished Scholar Award, the association’s highest accolade. It honors a lifetime of scholarly achievement in the study of human communication. Recipients are selected by their peers to showcase the best of the communication discipline. Download Full Image

Tracy previously received NCA’s prestigious Charles Woolbert Award and the Western States Communication Association’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 2018. 

Also, Hugh Downs School Associate Professor Daniel Brouwer received the Rhetoric and Communication Theory Division Faculty Mentor Award, and Assistant Professor Benny LeMaster received the Best Book Award from the Ethnography Division.

Hugh Downs School Professor Benjamin Broome and five current and former doctoral students received the Distinguished Scholarship Award for Top Journal Article from the International and Intercultural Communication Division. (Broome, B. J., Derk, I., Razzante, R. J., Steiner, E., Taylor, J., & Zamora, A. 2019).

“The number and nature of these awards clearly spotlight the great things we are doing in the Hugh Downs School,” said Paul Mongeau, professor and interim director of the Hugh Downs School. “From Sarah Tracy’s award recognizing a lifetime of scholarly achievement to graduate students’ top paper awards, these accolades are well deserved and represent a great deal of hard work, both in teaching and research.”

Additional awards were received by Hugh Downs School graduate students:

  • Corey Reutlinger, Top Student Papers Award, Ethnography Division.
  • Callie Graham, Top Student Papers Award, Interpersonal Communication Division.
  • Tyler Rife, Top Student Paper Award, Performance Studies Division.
  • Cristopher Tietsort, Top GIFTS (Great Idea for Teaching Students) Activity.
  • Benjamin Brandley, MA Thesis of the Year, American Studies Division and from the Spiritual Communication Division.

Broome, who is director of the Interdisciplinary PhD program in the Hugh Downs School, is especially proud of the achievements of the doctoral students: “Our students are always among the most visible of the graduate students at the conference, appearing on dozens of panels presenting innovative research that helps move the field forward, and they are regularly recognized with top paper honors in numerous divisions across the organization. This is a testament to both their accomplishments and the high quality of advising they receive in our doctoral program.”

See the full list of NCA presentations from the Hugh Downs School. 

Manager, Marketing and Communication, Hugh Downs School of Human Communication

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