Skip to main content

Zócalo Public Square, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County present ‘When Women Vote’ series

Three-part event to launch with an exploration of the evolution of women’s protests


|
August 04, 2020

Through tears and tear gas, for voting rights and driving rights, the history of women and protests has been long, inspiring, strong and terrifying. 

Nevertheless she persisted. 

In commemoration of this year’s centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, Zócalo Public Square and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) will present a three-part livestreamed event that will highlight the past, present and future of women in protest, power and progress.

“When Women Vote: A Zócalo/Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Event Series" will commence Aug. 20 with a dynamic discussion around the question, “How Have Women’s Protests Changed History?”

From the thousands-strong Women’s March on Versailles of 1789 to the female-founded Black Lives Matter movement, women have been on the front lines of social and political movements for centuries and continue to carry the message that there is still plenty of work to do. How have women risen up collectively to create change and influence broader movements in the process? What has made women particularly effective protesters, and what ideas have women come up with that have changed the art of protest? Activists and scholars will address these and other questions at the launch of this dynamic virtual series.

“One hundred years ago women demonstrated their power to effect political and societal change, and women are again on the front lines of protest and on the precipice of making history,” said Moira Shourie, executive director of Zócalo Public Square. “This is an important moment to create a space to broaden this dialogue and document this movement in real time with our event partners at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.”

Zócalo’s “When Women Vote” discussion series coincides with the launch of the NHM initiative “Rise Up L.A.: A Century of Votes for Women” that will feature the unveiling of an online exhibition on Aug.18, along with the video premiere of interviews for the NHM Oral Stories ethnographic project and a full exhibition of historical objects at the museum when it reopens in the fall.

“We are pleased to be partnering with Zócalo to mark the occasion of the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment with a timely and relevant series of discussions over the next three months,” said Lori Bettison-Varga, president and director of the Natural History Museums of Los Angeles County. “Los Angeles has a particularly compelling story within the national context of women’s right to vote and many of our current civic leaders have played a critical role in fighting for equality for decades.” 

Conversations in the “When Women Vote” series will continue on Sept. 16 with the question “Why Don’t Women’s Votes Put More Women in Power?,” followed by a third installment, “What Are Today’s L.A. Women Fighting For?” on Dec. 3. 

All events will be livestreamed across a number of platforms. Zócalo's YouTube stream will also include a moderated live chat in real time. Like all Zócalo programs, they are entirely free and open to the public. 

Get more information on the “When Women Vote” series and register for the event.

More Law, journalism and politics

 

Portrait of Elira Canga.

Former Humphrey Fellow returns to ASU Cronkite School for doctorate degree

Elira Canga arrived at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication a couple of years…

February 23, 2024
Portrait of Jemele Hill.

Jemele Hill to deliver lecture on race relations at ASU

Emmy Award-winning journalist Jemele Hill will be the featured speaker at the 2024 A. Wade Smith and Elsie Moore Memorial Lecture…

February 21, 2024
Eli Rosenbaum speaking at a lectern

Retired 'Nazi hunter' on international law as deterrence against war crimes

When it comes to using international law as a deterrent to protect the national security of the United States, is all hope lost…

February 20, 2024