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Interactive digital art on display at ASU gallery


August 29, 2003

TEMPE, Ariz. – The diverse works selected for ASU’s Computing Commons Gallery’s 2003-2004 season exemplify the expressive power of digital media and interactivity. The exhibits are curated by ASU’s Arts, Media and Engineering graduate research and education program (AME) and the Institute for Studies in the Arts (ISA). AME/ISA is one of the nation’s top institutes for arts research and education activities that focus on computational models and digital media.

CodeProfiles, W. Bradford Paley, Sept. 4 – Oct. 30, 2003, Computing Commons Gallery
Artist’s lecture, Sept. 18, 3 – 4 p.m., Intelligent Stage, Matthews Center

Paley, an artist and interaction designer, focuses on the visual representation of patterns hidden in information. CodeProfiles, commissioned by the Whitney Museum for its CODeDOC exhibition, exposes human and machine traces through the code that creates artworks. His series TextArc reveals patterns and concepts in literary texts that range from Beowulf to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Vortical Landscapes, Ned Kahn, Nov. 6 – Dec. 19, 2003, Computing Commons Gallery
Artist’s lecture, Nov. 13, 3 – 4 p.m., Computing Commons Auditorium

Ned Kahn honed his skills as an apprentice to Frank Oppenheimer at the Exploratorium in San Francisco after graduating with a degree in environmental studies. Inspired by wind, waves, fire, galaxies and black holes, his interactive sculptures explore and reveal the mysteries of natural phenomena.

Interdependence, Scott Snibbe, Jan. 22 – March 12, 2004, Computing Commons Gallery
Artist’s lecture, Jan. 22, 3 – 4 p.m., Computing Commons Auditorium

Scott Snibbe’s works in this installation are based on the Buddhist notion of “Emptiness,” meaning no object – physical or mental – exists independent of reality. The experiential nature of his constructed environments reacts to the presence of the participant, whether it is a beam of light or chaotic phenomena.

Inside Information, Mary Bates Neubauer, March 25 – May 14, 2004, Computing Commons Gallery
Artist’s lecture, March 25, 3 – 4 p.m., Computing Commons Auditorium

Herberger College School of Art professor Mary Bates Neubauer’s three-dimensional display of numerical data streams employs sophisticated surfaces containing embedded information as texture. Inside Information includes works modeled from databases derived from sunspot cycles and factors of solar wind, resulting in strikingly beautiful forms resembling nature.

The Computing Commons gallery is open during the academic year (September – May) and is located on the corner of Palm Walk and Orange Street, on the ASU campus. Hours are Mon. – Fri., 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. The Intelligent Stage is located in ASU’s Matthews Center on Cady Mall. For more information, the public may call 480-965-9438.

The Institute for Studies in the Arts is an interdisciplinary research and education center in the Herberger College of Fine Arts at Arizona State University. The ISA recently established the Arts, Media and Engineering graduate research and education program co-sponsored by the Herberger College and the Fulton School of Engineering at ASU. For more information about the AME/ISA, visit http://isa.asu.edu.

Media Contact:
Denise Tanguay 
480.965.7144
denise.tanguay@asu.edu